CPC #4: Evolutionary Friend or Foe?

CPC #4: Evolutionary Friend or Foe?

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READERS SUMMARY:

WHY IS IRON IMPORTANT?

HOW DOES IT AFFECT LIFE AT A 30ft LEVEL MICROSCOPICALLY

HOW DOES IT AFFECT LIFE AT A 30,000 ft LEVEL IN OUR OCEANS

HOW DID EVOLUTION USE IRON TO PROTECT US AND OUR SPECIES?

HOW DID A PROTECTIVE EFFECT BECOME A DEADLY DISEASE IN 50 YEARS RIGHT UNDER OUR NOSES?

IS THIS ALL TIED TO FACTOR X TOO AT SOME LEVEL?

 

This blog was specifically designed for the people who just experienced my Factor X Webinar unveiling so it may not make total sense to those who did not attend. For those who did attend you now have the context to understand the following “few modern diseases” that just may not be diseases at all because of how an evolutionary bottleneck sped up epigenetics.

HEMOCHROMATOSIS:

Iron is an element that is vital for life.  In fact, every form of life on this planet uses it to some degree to make sense out of the random chaos of the chemistry of atoms that life orders together to make the beautiful musical composition that is life.  For humans, metabolism requires Iron.  Iron carries oxygen to tissues in our cells but it can paradoxically make the ocean water crystal blue clear and devoid of life.   When Iron is present in abundance the water is green and filled with life.  Without iron our immunity crashes, we become dazed and confused, cold, and very lethargic.  Our metabolic rates can plummet.

Epi-paleo eating supports eating small fish with high omega three levels like anchovies.  They concentrate omega 3’s at the bottom of the marine food chain.  They get their iron from dust storms of iron blown from land that concentrate on phytoplankton.  In the ocean water where there is phytoplankton, there is zooplankton.  Phytoplankton concentrates the power of the sun using photosynthesis to re-oxygenate our oceans.  Without zooplankton, there are no anchovies or other small cold water fish.  Without anchovies,  we do not get big Ahi tuna who eat them.  Without Ahi tuna, I get cranky and our brains shrink because our mitochondria become inefficient transferring energy and information.

If you think Iron is not amazing think about this geologic evolutionary trick that occurred since India crashed into Asia to form the Himalayas.  Without the formation of the Mount Everest there would be no Sahara desert.  The Sahara desert dumps billions of gallons of iron dust into the oceans to stimulate the phytoplankton that supports the marine life of the North Atlantic.  This is also why the water in the North Atlantic is so green as well.  But this iron dust also allows the ocean to become a massive sump to generate massive plant growth in the ocean that can absorb massive quantities of CO2 out of the atmosphere to offset all the CO2 humans have been releasing into the air since the Industrial revolution.  (Geritol Solution)

So iron is a big factor for life in the seas.  Most modern medicine men focus on low iron states.  This leads to errors in judgement that makes us believe that more iron may be better for humans.  This is precisely why modern processed foods like grains, flour and baby formula all have fortified iron in them.  But iron in excess can be a very bad thing.  In fact, parasites seek iron stores out in our body.  Bacteria growth is stimulated to a great degree by iron.  When serum ferritin levels rise with LR or inflammtion you can bet the risk of a co morbid infection is not far away.  Dr. Eugene Weinberg proved in the 1950s that all bacteria undergo explosive growth when in the presence of excessive iron. The reason is very counterintuitive.  Iron increases anoxic photosynthesis that favors bacterial growth.  The iron regulation in the body is extremely complex.  When our skin defense are breached fluids like saliva, tears or mucous protect us by having metal chelators in them to protect iron stores from bacteria who seek out our iron.  When we first get ill and our defenses are mobilized and iron is placed under “SECRET SERVICE” protection by proteins that protect our endogenous stores from bacterial invaders who need it to survive.

The same thing occurs when cells undergo oncogenesis and begin to spread.  Cancer cells also have a huge hunger for iron.  Drugs are designed to limit its availability when cancer is present.  Some cancer patients are now instructed to cover their wounds with egg whites because the egg white protein protect the bodies iron stores from toxic use.  Why?  Eggs shells are porous to many things, so an egg has a white part to protect the more important yolk portion from attack.  It is the immune system of the egg.  Iron is a big deal.

THE BLACK DEATH: 1347-53

25 million people or half of Europe were wiped out by bubonic plague in two years from 1347 to 1349.  The plague has actually serially infected modern Europeans in every century until the 20th century to cause major death and illness but the effect was greatest in 1347 because our genome was not adapted to it at that time.  It is a bacterial disease caused by Yersina Pestis that collects in the lymphatic system and cause massive swelling of the lymph nodes of the body cause a gruesome disease.  When the lymph node explodes through the skin the bacterial infection becomes lethal.  When it is airborne it kills 95{a7b724a0454d92c70890dedf5ec22a026af4df067c7b55aa6009b4d34d5da3c6} of people and it becomes rapidly contagious.  It is believed the plague came to Europe by way of sailors on the sea who brought it to ports.  As the death sentence raged through Europe observes noted that Jews during Passover did not get sick as often as others did.  The reason is that they did not eat grains at this time.  The grains in Europe at this time were infested with rats who carried the bacterial and transmitted it to humans.  Others observed that the plague seemed to spare some and be deadly for others.  Women and children also fared better than adult men, for example.  In fact adult men, carried the highest risk of death from plague.  Why was this the case?

New data pointed to iron levels as the real issue increasing their risk.  Adult men had the highest iron content of humans alive in the 1300s. Women had lower iron levels due to pregnancy, lactation, and menstruation and children were often malnourished and this protected them from Yersina.  Adult males carried the highest risk because their iron levels were greatest.  This is precisely what the epidemiology of the plague showed occurred. So what did evolution do to combat this epigenetic threat?

It rapidly selected for men with the hemochromatosis genetic mutation to survive in Europe from 1347 all the way until 1900.  This is why the incidence of hemochromatosis is so high in European Ancestral peoples even today by www.23andme.com testing.  Hemochromatosis, a disease modern humans fear, actually is the work of natural selection to protect Europeans from Yersina Pestis that has chronically afflicted their population from 1347 until today.  Hemochromatosis, put iron stores in “solitary confinement status” in visceral organs.  Most of the iron is stored there so it can not wind up in the immune cells called macrophages in the liver and lymphatic system.

When macrophages lack iron in them they become ‘mafia like killers’ of those with Yersina Pestis bacteria. This one move protects the adult male from the ravages of  bubonic plague and allows them to live another day.  There is a trade off Mother Nature makes for this maneuver. With time, iron builds up in the viscera and causes organ failure, dysfunction and disease and possibly death but it happens slowly over a life span.  This allows the human male to survive to reproductive fitness and provide progeny for the next generation.  It is a highly protective epigenetic advantage that protects the adult European male from Bubonic Plague that has been chronically present in there environment for 500-800 years.

This sped up epigenetics is a result of retrotransposons in our genome that just 15 years ago we thought was “junk DNA”. Today we know that 97{a7b724a0454d92c70890dedf5ec22a026af4df067c7b55aa6009b4d34d5da3c6} of our DNA is used to alter our genome based upon epigenetic signaling. No other mammal on this planet has more junk DNA than humans. This means we are very responsive to environmental changes and can rapidly mutate our genome using retrotransposons that can jump to other parts of the genome. This essentially speds up genomic change using an epigenetic game plan. How did evolution come up with that idea? Survival is the short answer. As you saw in the Factor X webinar when faced with calamity what did evolutionary biology do to survive it? If you listened in to the Webinar you know precisely the answer now.

And where the junk DNA came from maybe more shocking. It seems it came from parasites, like viruses that we faced in our remote and recent past. This implies that infectious disease maybe a tool of evolution and not a disease state at all. They are the quickest mutators and fastest replicators in biology that we know of. Several billion years ago we usurped bacteria and turned them into mitochondria to make energy. It appears our recent ancestors have now usurped viral RNA and used reverse transcriptase to turn it into DNA and add it to our genome when it was given the proper epigenetic signal from our environment. This helped us rapidly develop an fast acting immune system and also help speed evolution from our primate ancestors as well.

Today modern man looks at hemochromatosis as a disease…when in reality it might be the result of epigenetic iron protection strategy that evolution used to keep adult males alive to allow for modern humans to survive in Europe for the last 500 years.  Today scientists realize that our ‘junk DNA’ seems to have the epigenetic information of the last 1000 years of our biology built into to it so that we can use it to defend against pathogens and events we have recently faced so that we can survive what ever life throws at us. It is our evolutionary bank account we save for a rainy day.

We now know that hemochromatosis was selected for by transgenerational epigenetics in the Viking men of the Northern coastline of Northern Europe.  We believe that the harsh Tundra of the north was mineral deficient and that women with this genetic defect would have fared as better child bearers because they were able to absorb more iron to birth more children who also carried the hemochromatosis defect into the next generation.  It is also believed that the Viking men might have survived the disease because their Gladiator type lifestyle was ferocious and they often faced serious blood loss that might have offset the iron defect.  As Vikings settled down in Northern Europe the mutation grew by using the “founders effect” caused by inbreeding due to small population sizes.  The founder effect means that any ‘non lethal defects’ are highly selected for and carried in the entire population of a people.  It is believed that the ‘Viking defect’ was blended into the the populations of Northern and Western Europe over 500 years to provide a solution to the recurrent Yersina outbreaks that caused bubonic plague and almost extinguished humans in Europe.  The chronicity of the infection was an ‘epigentic signal phenomena’ that allowed for selection of the hemochromotosis gene to confer reproductive fitness over longevity while the Yersina remained active in the human population.  This remained true for close to 500-800 years.

This “irony” may now explain why Ancient physicians were barbers and blood letters.  We used to believe this practice was ‘quackery’ but we now know that it was survival of fittest in action.  Blood letting had a major role in conferring more longevity to those with hemochromatosis of European descent.  Until the 20th century bloodletting was standard practice.  Then it was stopped and hemochromatosis became a modern disease. Canadian physiologist Norman Kasting found that blood letting also released the hormone vassopressin (ADH) from the posterior pituitary, and this reduced their fevers and increased their immune function to act faster. This find is clearly was not causation…but the correlation between bloodletting and fever reduction is massive in the human historical record. Bleeding them down may have helped fight infection when it was present.

It sounds crazy until you put on your Factor X lenses now. Consider that people in Africa live in a constant state of anemia because of malaria even today. In fact, if you replete them with iron to treat the anemia their rate of sepsis zooms higher. Do you think evolution knows something modern science may not?

Does this sound familiar to anyone who just listened to the Webinar?

Maybe Type 1 and 2 diabetes were initially epigenetic adaptations that also became disease in our current modern world?

Consider the following:

There is a huge difference in the prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes even today based upon geography. Type 2 diabetes is more common in the developed modern world and 85{a7b724a0454d92c70890dedf5ec22a026af4df067c7b55aa6009b4d34d5da3c6} of those with it also have co morbid obesity from the SAD and environmental toxins. Consider these facts about Type 1 diabetes. It is much more common in in people of Northern European descent. Finland has the highest rate of juvenile diabetes in the world. Sweden is second and the UK and Norway are tied for third. As you head south the rate plummets. This disease is really uncommon in African, Asian, and Hispanic descent even today. When a disease that is caused at least partially by genetics is significantly more likely to happen in a specific population, this is when the observant of us raise our evolutionary primal sense and begin to look for an ancient evolutionary link as to why it happened.

The reason is simple. When we see this occur it suggests that some aspect of trait that causes a disease today likely helped our ancestors in our past to survive. In the case of diabetes, high blood glucose levels allows a person to deal better with extreme cold because it lowers the freezing point of blood! It is natural antifreeze that allows life to exist in the cold. Seawater does not freeze at 32 degrees. It freezes at 28 degrees. Vodka does not freeze at 32 degrees in your freezer even though it has 60{a7b724a0454d92c70890dedf5ec22a026af4df067c7b55aa6009b4d34d5da3c6} water in the alcohol. It freezes at minus 20 degrees. What about glucose in suspension? Ice wine does not freeze either at 32 degrees because of the sugar content of the wine hence its name. Alcohol, like sugar is a natural antifreeze. The higher the sugar content content in liquid the lower the freezing point is. Sugar is what makes Slurpees a slush…and why it never freezes! It took 7- Eleven 20 years to figure out how to make artificially sweetened slurpees with an indigestible sugar moiety.

To make Ice wine in late harvest around frost time, a grape begins to protect itself by rapidly reducing its water content and by raising its sugar content. It tries to eliminate water when it gets cold. Now maybe you understand why you have the urge to urinate when you begin to use cold thermogenesis? You transiently are dumping water and raising your blood glucose levels just like a grape. But what happens in you is with longer adaptation you BG level drop as your fat mass shrinks. You eventually lose all your glucose stores and eventually just burn fat to survive. Humans have this ability as we evolved…..but the Neanderthals likely did not. Why you may ask?

Do ever wonder why they never won out in evolution against us? Modern science still struggles to figure out why? Could it be they could not become diabetic to survive the cold of the ancient past? After all we never find the Neanderthal skeletons in extreme Northern climates when the core ice samples show it was freezing cold? Coincidience or not? You decide.

The moral here is that we need to be aware of just how much we really are not even aware of it.  I think the evolutionary story of hemochromotosis from 1347 until 1900 represents what an epigenetic modification can look like when it is matched into the world it evolves. When the defect no longer fits the environmental model it can be than thought of as a disease and its major selective advantage complete lost to the modern world because they become unaware of what protective advantages it provided since the environment has also changed.

If you heard my Factor X webinar you maybe connecting some dots to why I think Factor X is vitally important for the biologic sciences to understand.  It is likely our Rosetta Stone or North Star in understanding how life makes sense out of the chaos that it is placed within.  This story is eerily similar to the modern day plagues of diabetes and of cancer.  Today modern medicine looks at both as disease states.  In CT 2 and CT 3 I proposed that diabetes and cancer might not be diseases at all.  They may be evidence of circadian mismatches brought out by mismatches in our environment.  Back in February this sounded radical.  When you consider what I explained to you here today about hemochromatosis and marry that information to what you learned in the Webinar about Factor X,  how radical are things now?  Might it be ingenious way of how evolutionary biology uses epigenetics to control our biology to navigate life to get us to reproductive fitness to extend survival of our species?  Inquiring minds will have much to ponder now.

Here is a teaser peek of for Type 1 diabetics to consider from:

Summary

The reasons for the uneven worldwide distribution of Type 1 diabetes mellitus have yet to be fully explained. Epidemiological studies have shown a higher prevalence of Type 1 diabetes in northern Europe, particularly in Scandinavian countries, and Sardinia. Recent animal research has uncovered the importance of the generation of elevated levels of glucose, glycerol and other sugar derivatives as a physiological means for cold adaptation. You might not have heard this before but did you know that insulin does not work when it is cold?  It is a thermoplastic protein for humans.  High concentrations of these substances depress the freezing point of body fluids and prevent the formation of ice crystals in cells through supercooling, thus acting as a cryoprotectant or antifreeze for vital organs as well as in their muscle tissue. In this paper, we hypothesize that factors predisposing to elevated levels of glucose, glycerol and other sugar derivatives may have been selected for, in part, as adaptive measures in exceedingly cold climates. This cryoprotective adaptation would have protected ancestral northern Europeans from the effects of suddenly increasingly colder climates, such as those believed to have arisen around 14,000 years ago and culminating in the Younger Dryas. When life expectancy was short, factors predisposing to Type 1 diabetes provided a survival advantage. However, deleterious consequences of this condition have become significant only in more modern times, as life expectancy has increased, thus outweighing their protective value. Examples of evolutionary adaptations conferring selection advantages against human pathogens that result in deleterious effects have been previously reported as epidemic pathogenic selection. Such proposed examples include the cystic fibrosis mutations in the CFTR gene bestowing resistance to Salmonella typhi and hemochromatosis mutations conferring protection against iron-seeking intracellular pathogens. This paper is one of the first accounts of a metabolic disorder providing a selection advantage not against a pathogenic stressor alone, but rather against a climatic change. We thus believe that the concept of EPS should now include environmental factors that may be nonorganismal in nature. In so doing we propose that factors resulting in Type 1 diabetes be considered a result of environmental pathogenic selection (EnPS).

Sound familiar to anyone? Sometimes when someone is real early with an idea they get branded a nut or a quack……..I like to think differently.

Want some more interesting facts: Look up the wood frog called Rana Sylvatica and researcher Ken Storey. The frog lives from the Arctic to the deep south in the USA. It freezes itself frozen solid in the winter but uses high blood glucose to keep it in suspended animation until spring comes and it and comes alive once again. Ken’s work was seminal to germ cell freezing and transplant medicine we use today. It appears that grapes, frogs and humans maybe able to all do this to some degree. I believe that Ancient humans may used this ability survive over Neanderthals when the environment became abruptly cold. The last time this appears to have happened was 13,000 years ago. It appears it helped our European Ancestors survive the dramatic violent cold of the Younger Dryas. Diabetes maybe evolution working its magic for survival even in us today. The only problem is that we do not face a true winter today……we just eat like we might face one.

Many modern scientists believe the Young Dryas where the reason modern humans began to introduce modern agriculture to survive. How ironic is that notion to the paleo community?

It appears that the abrupt onset of severe cold in Europe 13,000 years ago (an epigenetic event) may have stimulated us to consider using agriculture to survive. When we did this what did we really do to ourselves? I think Dr. Loren Cordain previous research shows precisely how it hurt our species longer term, but the fact that we used agriculture initially to offset an environmental pressure is more interesting. Moreover, that previous ‘evolutionary advantage’ is now killing us because our modern environment has changed while epigenetics has sped up simultaneously in modern humans. This puts us more at risk to any of these biologic mismatches now. This sounds a lot like the hemochromatosis and diabetes story to me today I have laid out here in this blog. Maybe this explains why we are seeing disease of aging 100 years ago now showing up in teenagers? All questions for you to think about now. Much of this blog was excerpted in total to give you a precise idea of how a modern disease may have begun as a naturally selected survival strategy. Most people are unaware of this genetic defect actually protects us today. It came to be because of the rapid epigenetic pressures placed upon humans by the bacteria because of the massive killing effect in 1347. Because the K-T event used a sped up epigenetic signaling program to allow eutherian mammals to sense changes in their environment quickly and adapt, modern humans have the most adaptable and fastest ability to change epigenetic program on this planet today. We use junk DNA to first change DNA expression and with sustained pressure selected for the genomic change and expanded it in survivors. This is a great modern example of how a sped up epigenetics works in us. We need to think about the good and bad it can do. It is definitely a double edged sword for modern humans.

I believe this gives biology and modern medicine an epistemologic foundation in evolution and should put practitioners back on track who understand these implications. For modern patients it gives you a new understanding and a way to view disease and health and save yourself from the current system.

I hope this stimulates some deeper thinking about the knowledge “you’re socialized” to believe is correct today. We are the only mammals that falls prey to socialization in this manner. I hope you become aware of just how much we really are not even aware of at all, because of factors we are not considering today.  This is another way a neolithic belief can subjugate our paleolithic genome when we have things in our blind spot.

 

Cites:

1. Survival of the Sickest. by Sharon Moalem
2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Younger_Dryas
3. http://www.medical-hypotheses.com/ar…054-X/abstract
4. A Bloody Good Remedy Chapter 6, R.S Root Bernstein
5. Biometals 17(2):135-139
6. Clinical Genetics 64 (1): 36-47

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341 Comments

  1. Rob Hamilton May 19, 2012 at 12:44 pm - Reply

    My head is still spinning trying to take in the events and the time span you laid out in the webinar. The work you are doing connecting evolutionary events in our world and bringing that to medicine is amazing. All of those dozens of little questions seem sort of trivial considering. Wow. wow. wow.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:34 pm - Reply

      @Rob coming from an MD and a person married to an MD I am glad to hear it. This information changed me on a dime 7 years ago. People want to focus in on the past but after this occurred to me……and I tested it for 7 years……..well, It will change everything about you. It certainly did to me. I am glad you liked the Webinar.

    • Jack September 30, 2012 at 12:37 pm - Reply

      Look Like Art DeVany is on board with my theories too now given his 9/25/2012 blog. http://artdevanyonline.com/1/post/2012/09/cold-exposure-and-diabetes.html

  2. MJ May 19, 2012 at 1:04 pm - Reply

    That was awesome…the implications are huge for the context we will need to view “diseases”…it makes history so much more relevant, LoL not a waste of time as a friend of mine likes to say it is! So many questions!!!!!!!! Are all diseases the result of epigenetic protection strategies? If that is the case, and your ancestors and their DNA have never faced an environmental situation or stress-or are you more likely to have difficulty surviving the next incident of that same stress, like a particular mineral deficiency or cold or whatever? Do viruses and bacteria work in concert with mother nature, or are they coincidental? Do human beings that interbreed face greater or lesser survivability? If people are attracted by smell to people of different genetic makeup, why do their parents/society sometimes object so to partnerships outside of their ethnicity? The list goes on…:) Thanks Dr. Kruse you give us much to ponder!!!

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:35 pm - Reply

      @MJ this is why HIV is ravaging Africa today…….It is the precise same thing Yersina Pestis did in Europe in 1347. The numbers today just are bigger because the world has more humans now.

      The implications are huge for biology because up until now modern medicine does not have a North Star or an epistemologic foundation. I believe the information I shared with you today changes that entirely.

  3. Maggie May 19, 2012 at 1:13 pm - Reply

    Jack, I found this completely fascinating. It reminded me of a novel, Darwin’s Radio, that I read years ago and and couldn’t stop talking about to friends. Here’s the synposis from Amazon, so you’ll see what I mean. The junk DNA in this book was producing a new type of human child…

    “Ancient diseases encoded in the DNA of humans wait like sleeping dragons to wake and infect again–or so molecular biologist Kaye Lang believes. And now it looks as if her controversial theory is in fact chilling reality. For Christopher Dicken, a “virus hunter” at the Epidemic Intelligence Service, has pursued an elusive flu-like disease that strikes down expectant mothers and their offspring. Then a major discovery high in the Alps –the preserved bodies of a prehistoric family–reveals a shocking link: something that has slept in our genes for millions of years is waking up.

    Now, as the outbreak of this terrifying disease threatens to become a deadly epidemic, Dicken and Lang must race against time to assemble the pieces of a puzzle only they are equipped to solve–an evolutionary puzzle that will determine the future of the human race . . . if a future exists at all.”

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:32 pm - Reply

      @Maggie Now you know why I have been quiet on this so long. The implications for a modern medicine person are staggering. How it all ties together makes a lot more sense when you realize this new perspective from our ancestral genesis.

      Just knowing factor X is not enough………understanding how to use it to our advantage is priceless and that is precisely what my mission is and has been since 2006.

  4. MJ May 19, 2012 at 1:18 pm - Reply

    If Junk DNA comes from viruses, is that similar to antibodies our bodies make after facing an illness, but on a core level?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:30 pm - Reply

      @Mj Today I believe that to be the case….I also believe our gut bacteria and other parasites lead to our guts shortening and becoming more leaky to allow for faster DHA and EPA assimilation as I mentioned in the Webinar. I hope you liked it since you were one of the few who guessed correctly before hand. I bet the implications of it have now stunned you huh?

  5. MJ May 19, 2012 at 1:24 pm - Reply

    What would nature be trying to accomplish with a virus like HIV? How could we learn from this? What would researchers need to look at? Not knowing a lot about viruses, are they constantly changing, creating anew? What influences a virus or bacteria to grow and especially to change?
    If we were to come into an ice age suddenly would diabetics be more likely to survive over non-diabetics? Is cancer the work of mismatches, is there any relation between cancer and junk DNA = viruses and bacteria of our ancestors?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:26 pm - Reply

      @MJ the envirnoment does…….you may be shocked to know that the virus that cause the great pandemic of 1918 which killed millions in the world was felt to be brought on by solar disturbances in the sun that altered our vitamin D status and subject many to ionizing radiation the year before…….With HIV I think this virus might be a killer now but its modes of action could be assimilated by our NK cells in our immune system to offer protection against RNA virus’s or disease moving forward……Its clear we got this disease from chimps so I think there is an evolutionary basis for it……and it might be looked at differently soon. Here is something others also have missed…..great ape and chimp lines use retrotransposons more than any other species on the planet. All retrotransposons we know about today are descended from RNA virus’s! How is that for coincidence! HIV is another RNA virus born in chimps and passed to humans…….Humans are the most sensitive to RNA virus than any other mammal because of how epigenetics has sped up as evolutionary history has proceeded from Factor X. This helps completely explain why HIV is so virulent in humans…….but one day it may help cure another disease we are facing…….because that is what incorporated RNA virus do for us……..they become junk DNA and they become the weapons that speed up epigenetics……..Very ingenious design we have in us.

  6. MJ May 19, 2012 at 1:26 pm - Reply

    When a stem cell becomes depleted is cancer the cell’s answer in the cell’s quest to become immortal, but gone wrong?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:22 pm - Reply

      @MJ as an organ or tissues stem cell lines become depleted they reach a point called cellular senescence. there is essentially no more cells to take over the place of the one that is wore out. Each cell has an inherit Hayflick number…..this is the number of times it can divide before it has to replaced by a stem cell. Stem cells are like our AA or AAA teams in baseball. When the cell reaches the point that it is wore out because its own Telomere is too short (At Hayflick limit) the cell has 2 choices……cell suicide, (apoptosis) and tissue failure, or become immortal (oncogenesis), it generally picks oncogenesis because apoptosis offers a certain death and oncogenesis may offer a possible outcome by using our reverse transposon in our junk DNA. The problem it seems is that evolution has not had enough time yet to figure out what that move might be……..it appears it is a dance with our both sides of our immune system and is very complex…….I’d expect this to be where we should be doing cancer research but we are not…….We are instead trying to kill the cell and not look at what it got that way to begin with and stop the progression…….or if it is present……can the body reverse engineer itself back to health……..there is a lot of evidence that this is what happens in slow growing tumors that are benign and in some cancers like prostate CA which often are indolent.

      There is another side to this too……aging is preprogrammed by evolution it appears…..aging is not accidental it may be intentional

  7. Holly Kirk May 19, 2012 at 1:32 pm - Reply

    So does high ferritin always indicate excess iron? One could have an elevated ferritin because LR or other inflammatory processes going and still be anemic, or low in iron, correct?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:11 pm - Reply

      @Holly no it does not because ferritin is also an actue phase reactant protein……it has to be taken in context of the case.

  8. MJ May 19, 2012 at 1:33 pm - Reply

    Is moderation really the enemy of evolution, is there never a time to maintain status quo since change does not always do you good?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:10 pm - Reply

      @MJ if there is I still have not found an example. I have been looking for 7 yrs.

  9. MJ May 19, 2012 at 1:33 pm - Reply

    Is moderation really the enemy of evolution, is there never a time to maintain status quo since change does not always do you good?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:10 pm - Reply

      @MJ if there is I still have not found an example. I have been looking for 7 yrs.

  10. Elin Duke Potter May 19, 2012 at 1:42 pm - Reply

    I used to be horrified by the idea of blood-letting. Taken in perspective, it’s fascinating that they were able to figure it out so long ago. This puts shamanic practices under a new light as well. Hmmm… which history should I re-read first?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:40 pm - Reply

      @Elin I thought that twist would catch some people and really change your perspective on what it good and what is bad. It is kind of like the people who tell you today that cold is hormetic alone. given what you now know………can you state that unequivocally as some have? I know I cant any longer and now you know why I released the Leptin Rx and CT series before I told you why……….because that info is actionable and you can use it to save you now……..cause it certainly is not going to hurt you.

  11. MamaGrok May 19, 2012 at 1:45 pm - Reply

    “When the defect no longer fits the environmental model it can be than thought of as a disease”

    and then you die. And the adaptation is selected right back out of the human race. Isn’t it brilliant?

    BTW, the writing here is so much improved! Only a few minor errors, and far more important, the logical flow is easy to follow and grasp. Kudos! (Maybe some who couldn’t follow early on will come back and read one of your more recent blogs and see if it piques their interest now.)

  12. MamaGrok May 19, 2012 at 1:45 pm - Reply

    “When the defect no longer fits the environmental model it can be than thought of as a disease”

    and then you die. And the adaptation is selected right back out of the human race. Isn’t it brilliant?

    BTW, the writing here is so much improved! Only a few minor errors, and far more important, the logical flow is easy to follow and grasp. Kudos! (Maybe some who couldn’t follow early on will come back and read one of your more recent blogs and see if it piques their interest now.)

  13. Doug May 19, 2012 at 1:50 pm - Reply

    this post describes how high iron levels may be problematic in leaving us susceptible to acquiring diseases (supporting viruses in the short-term, while acquiring other diseases like cirrhosis in the long-term)……. However previous post seems to point to the more iron the better…as in the darker skin of Inuits and Himalayans point to higher serum levels which gives them the greater ability to transport oxygen.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:12 pm - Reply

      @Doug…..the blog is about how when you dont know the context of why something happened in our evolutionary past and look at it through todays lens it appears to be a disease…….when it is not really a disease at all. It is now just a modern mismatch.

  14. indigogirl May 19, 2012 at 2:23 pm - Reply

    What I find really interesting is the way you put this all together.
    I had a feeling about what Factor X was but I never thought of the implications in terms of life today…on so many levels.
    It’s simple, elegant, intuitive and makes complete sense!

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:43 pm - Reply

      @indigo Many people who read my blog think everything is so complex……..on a microlevel it is………but today you got to see the 30,000 ft level and why the micro level works best and optimal a certain way. The events that caused it……….dictated the environment and dictated the biology of our original ancestors……..and now we can move the theory forward millions of years and make sense of a teen ager getting carotid disease or heart disease. We can understand fully how a child can get cancer and die from it quickly…….or why Alzheimer’s is showing up on 30 year old today when 60 yrs ago it was rare even an 80 year old. Factor X was where DNA stopped mattering so much and it is where epigenetics began to matter a lot. Mammalian DNA no longer has to change rapidly…..but the manner in which it is expressed has and Factor X is what caused this evolutionary frameshift. What has happened in taxa in 67 million yrs cant be compared to any other epoch in history.

  15. indigogirl May 19, 2012 at 2:23 pm - Reply

    What I find really interesting is the way you put this all together.
    I had a feeling about what Factor X was but I never thought of the implications in terms of life today…on so many levels.
    It’s simple, elegant, intuitive and makes complete sense!

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 2:43 pm - Reply

      @indigo Many people who read my blog think everything is so complex……..on a microlevel it is………but today you got to see the 30,000 ft level and why the micro level works best and optimal a certain way. The events that caused it……….dictated the environment and dictated the biology of our original ancestors……..and now we can move the theory forward millions of years and make sense of a teen ager getting carotid disease or heart disease. We can understand fully how a child can get cancer and die from it quickly…….or why Alzheimer’s is showing up on 30 year old today when 60 yrs ago it was rare even an 80 year old. Factor X was where DNA stopped mattering so much and it is where epigenetics began to matter a lot. Mammalian DNA no longer has to change rapidly…..but the manner in which it is expressed has and Factor X is what caused this evolutionary frameshift. What has happened in taxa in 67 million yrs cant be compared to any other epoch in history.

  16. ChimpChick May 19, 2012 at 5:18 pm - Reply

    Hey guys!

    I posted this on the forum, I am away with limited cell service (standing on the only hill in NC to sent this post)

    PLEASE CONSIDER THIS DOC!

    For us ‘POOR people” who work in the science field (on grants– that hardly put crap food on the table, much less healthy food) That cannot afford another monthly bill.. Would you PLEASE consider selling the replay at a one time fee?

    Thanks!

    Grass root people need to know too, even if we can’t afford it

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 6:07 pm - Reply

      @Chimpchick I will ask the MM. For forum members it maybe a good thing.

  17. ChimpChick May 19, 2012 at 5:18 pm - Reply

    Hey guys!

    I posted this on the forum, I am away with limited cell service (standing on the only hill in NC to sent this post)

    PLEASE CONSIDER THIS DOC!

    For us ‘POOR people” who work in the science field (on grants– that hardly put crap food on the table, much less healthy food) That cannot afford another monthly bill.. Would you PLEASE consider selling the replay at a one time fee?

    Thanks!

    Grass root people need to know too, even if we can’t afford it

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 6:07 pm - Reply

      @Chimpchick I will ask the MM. For forum members it maybe a good thing.

  18. john h May 19, 2012 at 5:51 pm - Reply

    Jack, fascinating! My wife has just had her bloods done and she is too high in ferritin and too low in ADH. Maybe time to give blood to the Blood Bank! Wouldn’t that be great if that worked..giving and receiving.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 6:10 pm - Reply

      @John Getting her the 23andme.com test on hemochromotosis might be wise.

  19. Ruby Kittany May 19, 2012 at 6:37 pm - Reply

    for more info, look up “Survival of the sickest” by Sharon Moalem.

  20. Ruby Kittany May 19, 2012 at 6:37 pm - Reply

    for more info, look up “Survival of the sickest” by Sharon Moalem.

  21. Julianne Burke May 19, 2012 at 7:02 pm - Reply

    Before I comment on this article, let me throw out there my experiences with the CT ice baths and some questions for anybody who can answer (don’t want to waste Jack’s time if unnecessary). First, I’d like to say that the baths are a GODSEND for quelling a hideous sciatica flare-up that’s plagued me for months but which seems to be going away after only a handful of baths *G* I’m dreadfully confused, though, and my questions have probably been covered elsewhere, but the sheer amount of posts & comments to go through for an answer is daunting.

    I’m confused about my peripheral circulation during the bath and afterwards – I keep my feet and hands out of the bath, and they actually feel surprisingly warm (the rest of me is comfortable-ish), but once I get out of the bath, my feet start to get really freezing numb for a while and feel like blocks, despite adding layers of socks. Anybody know what’s going on? I’ve always had poor circulation to my feet (probably the fault of too many years in tight combat boots) – could that have something to do with it? I’m wearing gloves, socks, and a knit cap in the bath now, which seems to help, but my feet are still a bit worryingly numb after. My shivering doesn’t start until I’m well out of the bath either – this is good, means I’m adapting, yes?

    Re this article: – rivetting reading! I’ve read the entire CT series with rapt attention, and it’s all coming together so beautifully at the 30,000 ft level – this environmental pathogenic selection make gorgeous sense.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 8:02 pm - Reply

      @Julianne The reason this might happen in you is something called the Hunter’s response. It is especially common in ancestral Scandinavians and Inuit’s. It is an autonomic response to cold that comes with adaptation to the cold. The constricted capillaries in you feet and hands reflexively vasodilate when your in the water (why it feels warm) sending a rush of blood to your feet. after some time they constrict again as your body attempts to return the blood to its core to warm it up. It is pretty common in Northern Europeans and Inuit’s. There is a cycling that can occur with prolonged exposure called a Lewis Wave or the hunter response. You can google it for more info. This is how Wim Hof was able not to get any Thermal damage running barefoot marathon in the Arctic circle as well. It is designed to protect your feet from frostbite when your cold adapted. it is a sign that your body is one with the cold already.

  22. Ruby Kittany May 19, 2012 at 7:25 pm - Reply

    now, the question is: so we don’t call diabetes a disease but an adaptation. cool. but what practical difference does it make to my diabetic 1 friend who has to inject himself with insulin a few times a day? btw, he is not crippled by it at all. in fact he cheerfully says that diabetes 1 is one of the best diseases to have because you can manage it on your own. he just got home after cycling alone for one year from Hong Kong through China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore in extreme humidity and heat. I am encouraging him to give his data for research as he kept a meticulous log of the composition of his food intake, energy expenditure and BG.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 7:42 pm - Reply

      @Ruby the actionable plan for a type one diabetic is simple……it is an epigenetic phenomena that he maybe able to improve upon. Go back and look at grandma and mother lives in detail……in particular the first few weeks of their pregnancy is critical and it appears that their physical and mental shape prior to pregnancy maybe helpful……if you determine that this maybe related to a stressor that is reversible the Type one diabetes maybe an autoimmune phenomena……23andme.com testing may shed light on more difficult cases where we dont know the transgenerational epigenomics……but we can infer what maybe a t problem.

      Could it be that your friend maybe able to alter their methylation patterns now to improve their clinical condition? Maybe. Can they discover that maybe they really were a type 1.5 diabetic and not a true type one……maybe. Moreover, they treated differently too these days. Yes…… their diet different too. Regardless of pattern this diagnosis means your friend must pay great attn to the mismatch in their life to improve its quality and quantity if that is their goal. That is how I would approach it.

      He is also likely better adapted to living in Scandinavia than he could ever know too…….!

      One more point…..those with type one DM also might find serious improvement or reversal if they use CT to induce their own BAT stores…..and that is the best actionable plan of this today in my view for your friend because BAT is designed to work best with diabetes as I laid out in the CT series.

  23. Ruby Kittany May 19, 2012 at 7:25 pm - Reply

    now, the question is: so we don’t call diabetes a disease but an adaptation. cool. but what practical difference does it make to my diabetic 1 friend who has to inject himself with insulin a few times a day? btw, he is not crippled by it at all. in fact he cheerfully says that diabetes 1 is one of the best diseases to have because you can manage it on your own. he just got home after cycling alone for one year from Hong Kong through China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore in extreme humidity and heat. I am encouraging him to give his data for research as he kept a meticulous log of the composition of his food intake, energy expenditure and BG.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 7:42 pm - Reply

      @Ruby the actionable plan for a type one diabetic is simple……it is an epigenetic phenomena that he maybe able to improve upon. Go back and look at grandma and mother lives in detail……in particular the first few weeks of their pregnancy is critical and it appears that their physical and mental shape prior to pregnancy maybe helpful……if you determine that this maybe related to a stressor that is reversible the Type one diabetes maybe an autoimmune phenomena……23andme.com testing may shed light on more difficult cases where we dont know the transgenerational epigenomics……but we can infer what maybe a t problem.

      Could it be that your friend maybe able to alter their methylation patterns now to improve their clinical condition? Maybe. Can they discover that maybe they really were a type 1.5 diabetic and not a true type one……maybe. Moreover, they treated differently too these days. Yes…… their diet different too. Regardless of pattern this diagnosis means your friend must pay great attn to the mismatch in their life to improve its quality and quantity if that is their goal. That is how I would approach it.

      He is also likely better adapted to living in Scandinavia than he could ever know too…….!

      One more point…..those with type one DM also might find serious improvement or reversal if they use CT to induce their own BAT stores…..and that is the best actionable plan of this today in my view for your friend because BAT is designed to work best with diabetes as I laid out in the CT series.

  24. Monte Diaz May 19, 2012 at 7:27 pm - Reply

    I specifically remember saying that part of factor x was viruses “donating” their DNA into ours and that this tied into evolution……..and not a peep….

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 7:45 pm - Reply

      @Monte because that is not it…….the rapid environmental disruption in seconds caused the sped up epigenetics……the transposons came after the event. We also know that too from the Human Genome project. We know even more now from the Human Epigenome Project as well. The epigenome matters a lot more to phenotypic expression as evolutionary time advances. That is the power that factor X conveyed and it is why NAD are now coming at alarming rates because our modern world is giving us more mismatch environmental cues than we have ever gotten before in hominid history.

  25. Julianne Burke May 19, 2012 at 8:05 pm - Reply

    Jack, oh my god, I love you! Blessings on your head – that’s wonderful news! Off to go read about this Hunter Response business.

  26. Julianne Burke May 19, 2012 at 8:05 pm - Reply

    Jack, oh my god, I love you! Blessings on your head – that’s wonderful news! Off to go read about this Hunter Response business.

  27. David Kenward May 19, 2012 at 8:37 pm - Reply

    @Julianne, I have had the same reaction as you. Eventually I found that if I just leave my knit hat on for as long as it takes me to warm up, my fingers and toes do not go numb. Like Jack said, your body is sending that blood to your core. If you prevent the heat loss by keeping your head covered, your body doesn’t have to move as much blood from the extremities.

  28. Ruby Kittany May 19, 2012 at 8:47 pm - Reply

    a bit of background info: my friend is 59 and diagnosed with diabetes 1 at the age of 21, which coincided with his move from his country of birth (north-ish Europe) to sub tropics — hm……..
    He was born in a major milk producing area of his country and cow milk was the mainstay of his and his family’s (ancestors) diet. To this day he drinks milk by the gallon – the remnant of his ancestors’ adaptation to milking whatever moved when normal food became scarce during the cold “spell”? He also eats oats and other grains by the bucket and minimal meat. He is thin as a rake and so far has no side effects associated with DM1. He is an enginner/geek obsessed with recording how his body works and performs, which I think would be worth analyzing by someone. He also can remain perfectly coherent evem when his BG hits 29.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 9:41 pm - Reply

      @Ruby he sounds like a very interesting study and I bet he is LADA and not a true type one.

  29. Ruby Kittany May 19, 2012 at 8:47 pm - Reply

    a bit of background info: my friend is 59 and diagnosed with diabetes 1 at the age of 21, which coincided with his move from his country of birth (north-ish Europe) to sub tropics — hm……..
    He was born in a major milk producing area of his country and cow milk was the mainstay of his and his family’s (ancestors) diet. To this day he drinks milk by the gallon – the remnant of his ancestors’ adaptation to milking whatever moved when normal food became scarce during the cold “spell”? He also eats oats and other grains by the bucket and minimal meat. He is thin as a rake and so far has no side effects associated with DM1. He is an enginner/geek obsessed with recording how his body works and performs, which I think would be worth analyzing by someone. He also can remain perfectly coherent evem when his BG hits 29.

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 9:41 pm - Reply

      @Ruby he sounds like a very interesting study and I bet he is LADA and not a true type one.

  30. JedEye May 19, 2012 at 8:48 pm - Reply

    When will us huddled massses of poor internet denizens get to know what factor X is?

    • Jack May 19, 2012 at 9:42 pm - Reply

      @Jed it is buried in these comments…….

  31. JedEye May 19, 2012 at 10:40 pm - Reply

    I am a bit spinning with all the information and, especially not having seen the webinar. What would you recommend for someone with normal blood iron levels but according to 23andme has “Has two copies of the H63D mutation in the HFE gene. Two copies of this mutation may experience slightly increased iron storage in tissues but has only marginally increased risk of iron overload symptoms.”

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 7:34 am - Reply

      @Jed I would eat more fish less red meat and I would stay away from fructose and lots of vitamin C when you do eat your meat or foods with Fe in it.

  32. JedEye May 19, 2012 at 10:40 pm - Reply

    I am a bit spinning with all the information and, especially not having seen the webinar. What would you recommend for someone with normal blood iron levels but according to 23andme has “Has two copies of the H63D mutation in the HFE gene. Two copies of this mutation may experience slightly increased iron storage in tissues but has only marginally increased risk of iron overload symptoms.”

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 7:34 am - Reply

      @Jed I would eat more fish less red meat and I would stay away from fructose and lots of vitamin C when you do eat your meat or foods with Fe in it.

  33. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 4:56 am - Reply

    @Jack – I quite enjoyed the webinar and would first like to thank you for the time and effort you’ve put into making all this digestible (pun intended) for all of us.

    Now for my take on what you have revealed.

    My takeaway is, I believe, tangentially different from your viewpoint and the viewpoints I see typically expressed here. If I were to summarize my take, I would say the following:

    EVOLUTION IS NOT OUR FRIEND

    First of all, I take issue with the anthropomorphization of evolution. Evolution is not a living, thinking entity and I think we do ourselves a disservice by talking about “what evolution wants.” Evolution does not want anything; it does not think, feel or have emotions. Evolution is simply a process with a set of principles that determine the future genentic makeup of an organism based either on selection pressures or, in some instances, mutations.

    From what I can tell, evolution is one process you DO NOT want to trigger. In fact, I would argue, that at any given moment, evolution is the last thing you want to happen. 100 million years in the future you may look back and feel thankful that the evolutionary process took place in the past, but for those organisms facing selection pressures in the present, evolution is not what you want.

    I look at evolution as process that seems, more often than not, to be more brute force. I do not think we should look at evolution as “shooting for an ‘A’.” Rather, evolution to me is a process that results in an extreme solution to extreme circumstances. And the preferable solution, if you had the power, would be to halt the evolutionary trigger in the first place, which I why I think the Leptin Rx and CT and sleep are so powerful.

    So if you allow the evolutionary process to start, expect some extreme results, most of which will not be beneficial for the majority of organisms facing selection pressures in the present moment.

    I mentioned in response to a previous blog that modern life is driving us towards our own evolutionary bottleneck. Intead of a cataclysmic natural disaster, we are facing the disaster of diseases driven by various aspects of modern life. And based on 16-year-olds having carotid thickening and 12-year-olds having Type 2 Diabetes, I would say we are about at the point where the selection pressures are signigicant enough that many people will face an early enough death and thus their genes, which are poorly adapted to modern life, will not be passed on. This is the true definition of natural selection.

    I do believe, as I stated before, that with sufficient continued pressure from modern life, that some humans will thrive and will pass on genes that will leave them well adapted to all these things that are currently making us sick.

    During the webinar, I asked if we should be taking a no holds barred approach, and you responded that this is what your blog is about: being optimal. I think you misunderstood me.

    I fully comprehend you are all about being optimal; but what I was talking about is stopping the evolutionary process dead in its tracks, at least as far as I am concerned. And my feeling is that if you continue down your current line of thinking, it will lead to a much expanded set of recommendations for being optimal. And if I may anticipate one of your next steps, please allow me to offer the following product for you to consider for use in addition to goggles and ice vests:

    http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/PPESafetySolutions/PPESafety/Personal_Protective_Equipment/Respirators/

    Thank you again.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 7:41 am - Reply

      @The kid I get your point….but to know how we run best we must examine what we are now and what we came from because we were designed by Evolution and therefore the processes of the past dictate what we should be doing for the most part today. I think what humans have introduced into their environment is rapidly speeding up the process of current evolution because our epigenetics have sped up. Look at the complexity of life that has occurred on this planet in just 67 million years. Then look further back and see how long it took. That shows you for a rapid geologic disaster she used the power law mathematic built into our epigenetic code that is ruled by our environment. What does the human brain do best? It creates new things from old thoughts but it keeps this biological principle “on the factory shelf” and we just continue to do things that kill ourselves faster. I believe this will further sped up change in our species. What will get I am not sure, but I am sure that Mother Nature will spin it in a way to make a better eutherian hominid in the future. She never comes out with a bad design…….she uses what she is given and makes sense out of the chaos that is.

      Moreover, I will say in the devastation found in today’s NAD and the SAD, I believe we will find some good from the diseases it rears. What they good will be we likely wont know for several hundred or thousand years, but the people in 1347 who got the plague paved the road for the future ancestors to live.

      Evolution is a process of the future and not the present. In fact, the present has never been the key to our past, it has always been the exception to the rule. The dawning of the Age of Mammals was set in motion by one of the more extreme events this planet has faced and life has faced.
      I think the conditions that selected for our ancestors IS still found in us and we still run best on those fuels because of the dramatic impact it made on all life at the time, but we have adapted away from them as a predominant source of electrons. Many will (and do) think just because we can eat this way now and get passed reproductive fitness, we get a pass on it. I don’t and never have. In my view human aging in a biologic novelty that requires us to understand where we came from to understand how best how to adjust what we are presently doing to navigate this biologic novelty.

      What we are doing now to ourselves is the polar opposite extreme of what we should be doing and we are seeing the results of these decisions in today’s NAD. Today, the things like cancer and HIV are viewed as diseases………but my question now is could it be paving the road for our progeny in some good fashion? And could it actually be helping us now in some unknown way? After all hemochromotosis was helping people in 1350 3 years after the Plague began, but Europeans did not know about it because they were clueless about the factors that controlled the plague. I think if we are mindful of what we are clueless about we might think better and not suffer from impoverished thinking. In my view, this is major blind spot of the current paleo community and why they have a real problem with my message. Their current belief and dogma is that if you eat Paleo your problems are for the most part solved. Im sorry, but the internet forums everywhere are loaded with examples of where that is not true. Some of the “leaders” of the community focus on those who get by with the diet alone. I focus on those who the diet fails…….and the reasons why it fails……Moreover, the diet is only a smart of the evolutionary story. the reason for that belief is buried in the story of the KT event. Those who listened to the Webinar got a very small slice of that yesterday. And what I gave them…….made them think deeply about what they really believe about diseases and health. Look at the two examples I pulled out here for this blog………..What you thought about Iron and hemochromotosis and diabetes also looks different from this perspective no?

      The question is now…….how many more modern diseases is this also true for?

      My blog will explore this for the next few years. That is why people will read. They want to know how the tsunami of KT event continues to hit our species even today……….

      And I am really interesting in examining how evolution dictates good from chaos………telomere biology and the jumping genes and retrotransposons in our junk DNA are instructive to us today………if we examine it. The movement today is more focused on the paleo diet…….I think that is fine because it is a PART of the equation……to be optimal we need to be mindful of all the parts to get to Optimal

  34. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 4:56 am - Reply

    @Jack – I quite enjoyed the webinar and would first like to thank you for the time and effort you’ve put into making all this digestible (pun intended) for all of us.

    Now for my take on what you have revealed.

    My takeaway is, I believe, tangentially different from your viewpoint and the viewpoints I see typically expressed here. If I were to summarize my take, I would say the following:

    EVOLUTION IS NOT OUR FRIEND

    First of all, I take issue with the anthropomorphization of evolution. Evolution is not a living, thinking entity and I think we do ourselves a disservice by talking about “what evolution wants.” Evolution does not want anything; it does not think, feel or have emotions. Evolution is simply a process with a set of principles that determine the future genentic makeup of an organism based either on selection pressures or, in some instances, mutations.

    From what I can tell, evolution is one process you DO NOT want to trigger. In fact, I would argue, that at any given moment, evolution is the last thing you want to happen. 100 million years in the future you may look back and feel thankful that the evolutionary process took place in the past, but for those organisms facing selection pressures in the present, evolution is not what you want.

    I look at evolution as process that seems, more often than not, to be more brute force. I do not think we should look at evolution as “shooting for an ‘A’.” Rather, evolution to me is a process that results in an extreme solution to extreme circumstances. And the preferable solution, if you had the power, would be to halt the evolutionary trigger in the first place, which I why I think the Leptin Rx and CT and sleep are so powerful.

    So if you allow the evolutionary process to start, expect some extreme results, most of which will not be beneficial for the majority of organisms facing selection pressures in the present moment.

    I mentioned in response to a previous blog that modern life is driving us towards our own evolutionary bottleneck. Intead of a cataclysmic natural disaster, we are facing the disaster of diseases driven by various aspects of modern life. And based on 16-year-olds having carotid thickening and 12-year-olds having Type 2 Diabetes, I would say we are about at the point where the selection pressures are signigicant enough that many people will face an early enough death and thus their genes, which are poorly adapted to modern life, will not be passed on. This is the true definition of natural selection.

    I do believe, as I stated before, that with sufficient continued pressure from modern life, that some humans will thrive and will pass on genes that will leave them well adapted to all these things that are currently making us sick.

    During the webinar, I asked if we should be taking a no holds barred approach, and you responded that this is what your blog is about: being optimal. I think you misunderstood me.

    I fully comprehend you are all about being optimal; but what I was talking about is stopping the evolutionary process dead in its tracks, at least as far as I am concerned. And my feeling is that if you continue down your current line of thinking, it will lead to a much expanded set of recommendations for being optimal. And if I may anticipate one of your next steps, please allow me to offer the following product for you to consider for use in addition to goggles and ice vests:

    http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/PPESafetySolutions/PPESafety/Personal_Protective_Equipment/Respirators/

    Thank you again.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 7:41 am - Reply

      @The kid I get your point….but to know how we run best we must examine what we are now and what we came from because we were designed by Evolution and therefore the processes of the past dictate what we should be doing for the most part today. I think what humans have introduced into their environment is rapidly speeding up the process of current evolution because our epigenetics have sped up. Look at the complexity of life that has occurred on this planet in just 67 million years. Then look further back and see how long it took. That shows you for a rapid geologic disaster she used the power law mathematic built into our epigenetic code that is ruled by our environment. What does the human brain do best? It creates new things from old thoughts but it keeps this biological principle “on the factory shelf” and we just continue to do things that kill ourselves faster. I believe this will further sped up change in our species. What will get I am not sure, but I am sure that Mother Nature will spin it in a way to make a better eutherian hominid in the future. She never comes out with a bad design…….she uses what she is given and makes sense out of the chaos that is.

      Moreover, I will say in the devastation found in today’s NAD and the SAD, I believe we will find some good from the diseases it rears. What they good will be we likely wont know for several hundred or thousand years, but the people in 1347 who got the plague paved the road for the future ancestors to live.

      Evolution is a process of the future and not the present. In fact, the present has never been the key to our past, it has always been the exception to the rule. The dawning of the Age of Mammals was set in motion by one of the more extreme events this planet has faced and life has faced.
      I think the conditions that selected for our ancestors IS still found in us and we still run best on those fuels because of the dramatic impact it made on all life at the time, but we have adapted away from them as a predominant source of electrons. Many will (and do) think just because we can eat this way now and get passed reproductive fitness, we get a pass on it. I don’t and never have. In my view human aging in a biologic novelty that requires us to understand where we came from to understand how best how to adjust what we are presently doing to navigate this biologic novelty.

      What we are doing now to ourselves is the polar opposite extreme of what we should be doing and we are seeing the results of these decisions in today’s NAD. Today, the things like cancer and HIV are viewed as diseases………but my question now is could it be paving the road for our progeny in some good fashion? And could it actually be helping us now in some unknown way? After all hemochromotosis was helping people in 1350 3 years after the Plague began, but Europeans did not know about it because they were clueless about the factors that controlled the plague. I think if we are mindful of what we are clueless about we might think better and not suffer from impoverished thinking. In my view, this is major blind spot of the current paleo community and why they have a real problem with my message. Their current belief and dogma is that if you eat Paleo your problems are for the most part solved. Im sorry, but the internet forums everywhere are loaded with examples of where that is not true. Some of the “leaders” of the community focus on those who get by with the diet alone. I focus on those who the diet fails…….and the reasons why it fails……Moreover, the diet is only a smart of the evolutionary story. the reason for that belief is buried in the story of the KT event. Those who listened to the Webinar got a very small slice of that yesterday. And what I gave them…….made them think deeply about what they really believe about diseases and health. Look at the two examples I pulled out here for this blog………..What you thought about Iron and hemochromotosis and diabetes also looks different from this perspective no?

      The question is now…….how many more modern diseases is this also true for?

      My blog will explore this for the next few years. That is why people will read. They want to know how the tsunami of KT event continues to hit our species even today……….

      And I am really interesting in examining how evolution dictates good from chaos………telomere biology and the jumping genes and retrotransposons in our junk DNA are instructive to us today………if we examine it. The movement today is more focused on the paleo diet…….I think that is fine because it is a PART of the equation……to be optimal we need to be mindful of all the parts to get to Optimal

  35. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 7:58 am - Reply

    @Jack – You are no doubt correct that our descendants will benefit from the present pressures. But since so much of what you do is geared toward helping all of us in the present, I am viewing this through the lens of our present circumstances.

    And what your webinar opened me up to was the critcality of our present moment. It doesn’t get more critical than a bottleneck. And because of our big brains, we actually have the power to step away from that bottleneck. But if we don’t, then the race is on to see what genes are going to survive. And I think the message that has to be heard loud and clear by everyone is that that instead of facing one event, we are facing a “death by 1000 cuts” scenario that is pushing us further and faster towards an evolutionary tipping point.

    So from where I stand, I’m not really interested in a distant future where “extremophile” humans thrive by eating nothing but packaged foods and drinking corn syrup by the bottle. I am hoping that we can obviate the need for such a timeline. But the task is monumental because as I noted, it’s not just food, cold and sleep.

    It’s toxins in the air, high particulate counts, toxins in synthetic materials, plastics EVERYWHERE, heavy metals, side effects of pharmaceuticals, stress, soil depletion, etc. etc. etc. It is so multi-factorial.

    Can we turn the ship? I hope so. But in the meantime, in the polluted dusty city where I live, I make sure to have a mini-respirator or at least a face mask at my disposal. My goggles are in the mail. My showers are cold, my meat is largely grass fed and my fish comes out of the north atlantic. Oh, and bed time is getting earlier.

    Game on.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:10 am - Reply

      @The Kid we can turn the ship…….but are willing to do what we need to? That is what the blog is about. Considering how people in the community have reacted to CT series…….I dont have the faith in our species as you do. But do I think there will be a select few who get it……and thrive because of it? Yes I do…….and in that sense maybe this will follow the same power laws of the KT event. Once you realize that epigenetics has been sped up…….then you begin to realize that slowing down your circadian clocks becomes the goal to maximize your current life.

      What I have uncovered is the the road to optimal requires you to go totally against the modern grain……how ironic is that to be an American in this world…….most of us are unaware of this issue as well. We may understand parts of it……like the USDA and FDA nonsense…….but what about our technology industry and its goals?

  36. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 8:22 am - Reply

    @Jack – OK, enough philosophy. Now back to the pressing issues of today: What do you think is at the root of halitosis and/or general, consistent bad breath? 🙂

    Is it a “tell” for something underlying?

    Thanks

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:25 am - Reply

      @The Kid…..easy……it is from anaerobes in the oral cavity. And this tells me the gut is real leaky…….that should not be a surprise to you now considering all we have spoken about.

  37. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 8:22 am - Reply

    @Jack – OK, enough philosophy. Now back to the pressing issues of today: What do you think is at the root of halitosis and/or general, consistent bad breath? 🙂

    Is it a “tell” for something underlying?

    Thanks

  38. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 8:35 am - Reply

    @Jack – Actually, for once its not me. I’m trying to help a family member and just am trying to show them how things are related. So I guess we’ll explore some gut healing now.

  39. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 8:35 am - Reply

    @Jack – Actually, for once its not me. I’m trying to help a family member and just am trying to show them how things are related. So I guess we’ll explore some gut healing now.

  40. TheKid May 20, 2012 at 8:37 am - Reply

    @Jack – The other stranger symptom would actually be with me. Which is a hyper-senstive sense of smell. I can’t figure out why I’ve got that. And for me, that make bad breath of others difficult to handle.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:42 am - Reply

      @The kid when your Mag and Zn levels approach optimal your sense of smell will improve and it maybe a sign that your inflammation levels around the base of your orbital frontal lobes is improving. I think that is a good sign

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:43 am - Reply

      @the kid……may mean that the bad breath has been their for a while and now your noticing it because your health is getting better.

      • Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:59 am - Reply

        @Michelle Factor X was an environmental global event at the dawning of the Age of Mammals. It was the KT event. It affected all the animals that were on the planet at one time in the matter of seconds……and it still effects the survivors of the event millions of years from the event because of what the event caused biology to use to secure our ancestors ultimate survival. The sped up epigenetics is what is now a major problem for modern hominids because what it has allowed our brains to do to us while time has passed from KT. The animals that survived this event…….are our ancestors. And the Rx cure used by evolution back then 67 million years ago has now become the source of our current problems in NAD generation…….and we remain blind to it even in the most progressive modern health communities.

  41. Pamela May 20, 2012 at 10:09 am - Reply

    What is NAD?

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 10:14 am - Reply

      @Pamela NAD = Neolithic Associated diseases

  42. Zorica Vuletic May 20, 2012 at 10:51 am - Reply

    @Michelle Factor X was an environmental global event at the dawning of the Age of Mammals. It was the KT event. It affected all the animals that were on the planet at one time in the matter of seconds……and it still effects the survivors of the event millions of years from the event because of what the event caused biology to use to secure our ancestors ultimate survival. The sped up epigenetics is what is now a major problem for modern hominids because what it has allowed our brains to do to us while time has passed from KT. The animals that survived this event…….are our ancestors. And the Rx cure used by evolution back then 67 million years ago has now become the source of our current problems in NAD generation…….and we remain blind to it even in the most progressive modern health communities.

    Thanks Dr. K! The way you weave everything leads up to what you say about Factor X. Using a bit of thinking and connecting dots, it was always accessible to even the ‘poor’ of us. So even if since January (when I started reading your blog) it was not easy to ‘label’ it as Factor X, I felt like everything kept adding up and cumulative. I was comfortable in thinking about the concept of say, diabetes I and II are not ‘diseases’ as such as you have outlined.

    Again, thanks for all of the information you provide! For all the people that feel confused about what Dr. K and prefers the webinars for more concise and labelled terms for his concepts, just have patience and read ALL of the blog. I remember reading the quilt a few times over at different stages of my reading the blog…and each time it makes more sense with each new information I read. It’s quite impressive! As a result I gather what are the most important aspects and spend my money on those. Even without testing (which sucks) I just know what is the important things for me and I address them based on all the pieces of this blog from posts to comments, to forums…to help myself the best I can.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 11:26 am - Reply

      @Zorica When I teach you how to make factor X actionable you will see its beauty. It will make you change how you think about wellness and disease right now…….because these thoughts are why we are in the mess we are today in healthcare. To begin to change the world we first have to define the problem……..the problem began where our ancestors began……at the dawn of the age of mammals……..and back then it was a great thing…….but today it is what is killing us quicker than most of us realize.

      this is precisely how hemochromatosis once saved us……..and now it plagues us. There is evidence of my theories all around you but you cant see what you’re not looking for.

  43. Zorica Vuletic May 20, 2012 at 10:51 am - Reply

    @Michelle Factor X was an environmental global event at the dawning of the Age of Mammals. It was the KT event. It affected all the animals that were on the planet at one time in the matter of seconds……and it still effects the survivors of the event millions of years from the event because of what the event caused biology to use to secure our ancestors ultimate survival. The sped up epigenetics is what is now a major problem for modern hominids because what it has allowed our brains to do to us while time has passed from KT. The animals that survived this event…….are our ancestors. And the Rx cure used by evolution back then 67 million years ago has now become the source of our current problems in NAD generation…….and we remain blind to it even in the most progressive modern health communities.

    Thanks Dr. K! The way you weave everything leads up to what you say about Factor X. Using a bit of thinking and connecting dots, it was always accessible to even the ‘poor’ of us. So even if since January (when I started reading your blog) it was not easy to ‘label’ it as Factor X, I felt like everything kept adding up and cumulative. I was comfortable in thinking about the concept of say, diabetes I and II are not ‘diseases’ as such as you have outlined.

    Again, thanks for all of the information you provide! For all the people that feel confused about what Dr. K and prefers the webinars for more concise and labelled terms for his concepts, just have patience and read ALL of the blog. I remember reading the quilt a few times over at different stages of my reading the blog…and each time it makes more sense with each new information I read. It’s quite impressive! As a result I gather what are the most important aspects and spend my money on those. Even without testing (which sucks) I just know what is the important things for me and I address them based on all the pieces of this blog from posts to comments, to forums…to help myself the best I can.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 11:26 am - Reply

      @Zorica When I teach you how to make factor X actionable you will see its beauty. It will make you change how you think about wellness and disease right now…….because these thoughts are why we are in the mess we are today in healthcare. To begin to change the world we first have to define the problem……..the problem began where our ancestors began……at the dawn of the age of mammals……..and back then it was a great thing…….but today it is what is killing us quicker than most of us realize.

      this is precisely how hemochromatosis once saved us……..and now it plagues us. There is evidence of my theories all around you but you cant see what you’re not looking for.

  44. ChimpChick May 20, 2012 at 11:16 am - Reply

    Thanks!

  45. Maggie May 20, 2012 at 11:33 am - Reply

    Jack: Wasn’t the speed of evolution accelerated for mammals because there were so many ecological niches left open by the extinction of large vertebrates? Once those niches are full, why does epigenetic change continue at the same pace? Or does it? I’m finding it hard to make the connection between the triggering event of the KT catastrophe and more modern times. Or did other liminal events like climate change, the development of agriculture, or the extinction of large mammals continue the process? Sorry if these are naive questions.

  46. Maggie May 20, 2012 at 11:33 am - Reply

    Jack: Wasn’t the speed of evolution accelerated for mammals because there were so many ecological niches left open by the extinction of large vertebrates? Once those niches are full, why does epigenetic change continue at the same pace? Or does it? I’m finding it hard to make the connection between the triggering event of the KT catastrophe and more modern times. Or did other liminal events like climate change, the development of agriculture, or the extinction of large mammals continue the process? Sorry if these are naive questions.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:41 pm - Reply

      @Maggie your question is a superb one and it is what most assume to be true today as well. But here is what they forgot in the theory formulation. Time and development. We know from the fossil record that the eutherian mammals of the day were quite small and underground for the most part in the cold. These were the ancestors we came from. In a short 67 million years we went from them to us…….a modern hominid. It took life 4.5 billion years to go from a single cell to a T.Rex. The relative time span differences were massive……and in that 4.5 billion years there were other more devastating extinction events. The deadliest one we know about is The Permian–Triassic extinction event, informally known as the Great Dying. The P-T event forms the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geologic periods, as well as the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras. It was the Earth’s most severe known extinction event, with up to 96% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species becoming extinct. It is the only known mass extinction of insects. It occurred only 250 million years ago but we did not show up in that proceeding time. Why? Because the method of extinction was decidely different than KT…….KT selected for a completely different world…….(environment was freezing cold in a matter of seconds) and the currency used in KT was a sped up epigenetics.

      We could only come from the the animals left standing by pure randomness. This also fits in with the ‘uncertainity principle’ of Heisenberg. It also shows life will always find a way given the hand she is dealt. We are here because of the events surrounding K-T. We could not evolve from the events of the P-T event. Also be mindful that there was almost 180 million years between P-T and the KT event. This is three times the time we have had since the KT event so time was not the critical factor…….it was the environment that was the critical factor that determined the path that life would choose.

      The environment is the key to the what survives and what does not. It is all about epigenetics. Survival is about being an outlier and not animal who just makes it. In evolution moderation is punished. When you pursue moderation you get average survival and life. That is what is happens to modern humans now because we are blinded to this reality. We follow modern healthcare dogma and not evolutionary medicine to guide us in decisions and we get suboptimal results too often.

      Post K-T Event selected for us and we used a sped up epigenetics to get the job done of survivalship. That is how we went from small rodents to modern hominids in a far shorter time than what occured in the P-T event. Temperature was not the deciding factor. In the P-T event life on earth was hotter by about 14 .5 degrees and there was 180 million more years to evolve but yet we did not arise from that extinction. P-T was a serial extinction and we believe it was due to serial high levels of persistent CO2 gases from a variety of causes. So mammals do not appears to be best selected in a warm environment with high CO2. The world post K-T event was cold and had a low CO2. And then we showed up in record time after this event and environment existed. That should say something to a thinking mind. It may not be conventional or popular wisdom but it is factual.

      Mammals work best in cold and always have. They are best adapted to burning fats and not sugar. K-T selected precisely for this animal

      Mother Nature did not use a faster epigenetics in the P-T event to guarantee survival because the the Ancient Pathway requires cold! She used plants to come back from extinction because plants use high levels of CO2 in photosynthesis. It was also very hot in the P-T extinction due to the greenhouse effect of the CO2. The geology records show that plant life was the dominant way we recovered and in fact it took vertebrates almost 30 million years to make any sort of recovery. In the P-T extinction you had way more ecologic niches opened to our ancestors………but we could not access them because eutherian mammals are designed to fluorish in the COLD not the hot!!!!!

      And how did they rapidly expand in a short 67 million years? They used the speed of epigenetics, and currency was “junk DNA” we usurped from parasites………Moeover, all primate DNA is loaded with junk DNA and our DNA is, too! Shocking coincidence?

      I doubt it………It is the fastest way to mutate a genome to sped up epigenetics is to use methylation and RNA incorporation…….and it uses methylation and retrotransposons to do it. The science is already air tight………and the truth of this theory is preserved in the fossil records in our museums. Moreover, you are here reading this today as the ultimate truth that the theory is correct.

      This is why I knew the Ancient Pathway had to exist in any mammal who navigated the KT event. It was obvious when I thought about the geologic and fossil records. I just put two concepts that were known to be true and came up with a new concept. I was not inventing science at all. I was innovating it by using my mind.

  47. AmyK May 20, 2012 at 11:48 am - Reply

    This quote:

    From Dr. K in Comment 59: “There is evidence of my theories all around you but you cant see what you’re not looking for.”

    …reminds me of this quote:

    “The range of what we think and do is limited by what we fail to notice. And because we fail to notice that we fail to notice, there is little we can do to change; until we notice how failing to notice shapes our thoughts and deeds.” — R. D. Laing”

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 2:38 pm - Reply

      @Amy K thanks for that quote……I have not seen it before but it is spot on true.

  48. AmyK May 20, 2012 at 11:48 am - Reply

    This quote:

    From Dr. K in Comment 59: “There is evidence of my theories all around you but you cant see what you’re not looking for.”

    …reminds me of this quote:

    “The range of what we think and do is limited by what we fail to notice. And because we fail to notice that we fail to notice, there is little we can do to change; until we notice how failing to notice shapes our thoughts and deeds.” — R. D. Laing”

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 2:38 pm - Reply

      @Amy K thanks for that quote……I have not seen it before but it is spot on true.

  49. Randall Chapman May 20, 2012 at 11:55 am - Reply

    Submitted on forum as well:

    It seems much clearer to me now. We have evolved from the mammal line that had it in them (biochemically, DNA, epigenetics, etc.) to adapt very rapidly to very rapid environmental changes. And we still have that “ancient pathway.” With the KT event, if your species couldn’t adapt like RIGHT NOW, you perished.

    Therefore, knowing that we are a species that can adapt fast, and knowing that our lineage had to adapt to a cold and probably hypoxic environment, and knowing that we need to be yoked to the natural circadian rythms, and knowing that cold helps correct our mismatches–opening up the ancient pathway–then we can choose to change our protocols and make those adaptations that result in health and fewer mismatches. We can choose our diet, we can choose hot or cold, we can choose the style and manner of our exercise, and we can choose to live a more natural circadian profile–get better sleep–all resulting in an N=1 member of the species far healthier than the “average” person who is unaware.

    So, a ketogenic paleo diet, CT, Circadian sleep cycles yoked to natural light cycles, and lift heavy things once in awhile, goes a long way to being optimally healthy. The right protocol can lead to a positive (from a health perspective) epigenetic change within one’s own lifetime. Start now! That is the whole point of evolving from a line of mammals that nature kicked to ground–but they got up immediately and ultimately thrived! Nature forced evolution to speed up!!!!

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:51 pm - Reply

      Randy you have solved the puzzle. That is what I realized in 2007. And it is precisely how I fixed me. The answer was not based in medicine…….It was based in the evolutionary biology that allowed our species to survive at KT. We all know that everyone of us is here today because a eutherian mammal navigated that event. What we are not aware of is that the world then was freezing cold, had limited food, and and had a southern hemisphere on fire. That is why the ketogenic paleo diet is highly selected for in most ancestors of these animals. In the subsequent 67 million years there has be further evolution in families and other lines but the primate line where we come from still retains the original design. I told my son a 1958 Corvette does not look like the one today but guess what…….it is a still a car about speed and power. And that is why we are mammals who run best on protein and fat and do well in the cold. We were designed for it and naturally selected for it the KT event. Today the waves of that event are hitting still in my clinic in neolithic disease development.

  50. Randall Chapman May 20, 2012 at 11:58 am - Reply

    Posted on forum as well.

    Same reason chickens can manifest differently very quickly–from one of the cited studies on epigenetic change.
    Same reason dogs–same species–can be so different. They also came from the same “surviving” lines. Environmental pressures cause changes within just a couple of generations.

    Flying dinosaurs, who escaped and then had to have it in themselves to rapidly adapt, and the small eutherian mammals that were in hybernation. Keys to the puzzle. Awesome stuff to ponder further.

    We can “force” ourselves to revert to a healthier (or not) epigenetic profile especially based on mothers and grandmothers, and that is why the current new young generation is getting sicker because their mothers and grandmothers were trapped/yoked to the environmental pressures leading to neolithic diseases– artificial lights, artificial food! They were just unaware of even the possibility of mismatches. Nature continues to accelerate evolution. More pieces to the puzzle.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:45 pm - Reply

      @Randy……..I thought you would dig this…….the implications are massive.

  51. Randall Chapman May 20, 2012 at 11:58 am - Reply

    Posted on forum as well.

    Same reason chickens can manifest differently very quickly–from one of the cited studies on epigenetic change.
    Same reason dogs–same species–can be so different. They also came from the same “surviving” lines. Environmental pressures cause changes within just a couple of generations.

    Flying dinosaurs, who escaped and then had to have it in themselves to rapidly adapt, and the small eutherian mammals that were in hybernation. Keys to the puzzle. Awesome stuff to ponder further.

    We can “force” ourselves to revert to a healthier (or not) epigenetic profile especially based on mothers and grandmothers, and that is why the current new young generation is getting sicker because their mothers and grandmothers were trapped/yoked to the environmental pressures leading to neolithic diseases– artificial lights, artificial food! They were just unaware of even the possibility of mismatches. Nature continues to accelerate evolution. More pieces to the puzzle.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:45 pm - Reply

      @Randy……..I thought you would dig this…….the implications are massive.

  52. ATL_Paleo May 20, 2012 at 12:22 pm - Reply

    Ferritin vs Iron Serum test… Is a Ferritin test useful if Iron Serum results are within the functional range of 85 to 135, and almost no inflammation (HS-CRP of 0.10)?

    Or to rephrase, when is one test better than the other?

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:44 pm - Reply

      @Atl that is not enough context to know a thing……..but your low HS CRP tells me that you likely are very young or dont have HC at all.

  53. ATL_Paleo May 20, 2012 at 12:22 pm - Reply

    Ferritin vs Iron Serum test… Is a Ferritin test useful if Iron Serum results are within the functional range of 85 to 135, and almost no inflammation (HS-CRP of 0.10)?

    Or to rephrase, when is one test better than the other?

  54. Maggie May 20, 2012 at 1:41 pm - Reply

    Re the video about the autopsies that show people with cancer aren’t really dying of cancer: this is the result of Our War on This and War on That thought paradigm–war on cancer, war on drugs,etc etc. This other approach That Jack is talking about opens the windows and lets in light and fresh air: look in a more friendly way at the thing that’s so frightening and seemingly destructive and try see what it is before you declare war and make it worse

  55. Maggie May 20, 2012 at 1:41 pm - Reply

    Re the video about the autopsies that show people with cancer aren’t really dying of cancer: this is the result of Our War on This and War on That thought paradigm–war on cancer, war on drugs,etc etc. This other approach That Jack is talking about opens the windows and lets in light and fresh air: look in a more friendly way at the thing that’s so frightening and seemingly destructive and try see what it is before you declare war and make it worse

  56. Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:43 pm - Reply

    @Susan contact the MM on Monday and they will get it worked out. I do not handle that angle at all.

  57. Jack May 20, 2012 at 1:43 pm - Reply

    @Susan contact the MM on Monday and they will get it worked out. I do not handle that angle at all.

  58. MJ May 20, 2012 at 2:13 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse, a big yes, I loved the webinar! I understood some of the implications in having figured out what factor x was back when, but the webinar has brought me even more things to think about. I am really looking forward to the deep thought this will bring to our group! Thanks for the great explanations, and to the MMs for their interesting graphics! Tomorrow I hope to make some time to dig in deeper on the forum…

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 2:14 pm - Reply

      @MJ the forum is on fire now because they are beginning to see what it really means…….

  59. MJ May 20, 2012 at 2:13 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse, a big yes, I loved the webinar! I understood some of the implications in having figured out what factor x was back when, but the webinar has brought me even more things to think about. I am really looking forward to the deep thought this will bring to our group! Thanks for the great explanations, and to the MMs for their interesting graphics! Tomorrow I hope to make some time to dig in deeper on the forum…

  60. AmyK May 20, 2012 at 2:48 pm - Reply

    @Dr. K You’re welcome.

  61. golooraam May 20, 2012 at 3:07 pm - Reply

    after listening to the webinar and reading this blog – I just switched my meal from grassfed chuck meat to wild king salmon cooked in pastured butter with serrano peppers and sweet potatoes, and wild bay shrimp with avocado – I hope I can still have my sidedish of raw grassfed goat liver 🙂

  62. golooraam May 20, 2012 at 3:07 pm - Reply

    after listening to the webinar and reading this blog – I just switched my meal from grassfed chuck meat to wild king salmon cooked in pastured butter with serrano peppers and sweet potatoes, and wild bay shrimp with avocado – I hope I can still have my sidedish of raw grassfed goat liver 🙂

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 3:13 pm - Reply

      @Golooram Not a bad change at all.

  63. Zorica Vuletic May 20, 2012 at 5:42 pm - Reply

    Just to let you know, that like v who is really Weila Smith, this site converts my name I chose of Gladina to my actual name. This is OK, but just to let you know it’s the same person: Zorica = Gladina.

    Btw, just finished my tasty wild caught salmon with skin on cooked in grass fed butter with side dish of mashed cauliflower, cilantro, spinach and mushrooms. I do eat more ‘starchy’ veg, just not every day…today was not one of them.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 5:47 pm - Reply

      @Gladina It is OK who ever you are. I dont get caught up things like that any longer. That was a past chapter in my life. I tend to live life driving looking out the windshield these days.

  64. Zorica Vuletic May 20, 2012 at 5:42 pm - Reply

    Just to let you know, that like v who is really Weila Smith, this site converts my name I chose of Gladina to my actual name. This is OK, but just to let you know it’s the same person: Zorica = Gladina.

    Btw, just finished my tasty wild caught salmon with skin on cooked in grass fed butter with side dish of mashed cauliflower, cilantro, spinach and mushrooms. I do eat more ‘starchy’ veg, just not every day…today was not one of them.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 5:47 pm - Reply

      @Gladina It is OK who ever you are. I dont get caught up things like that any longer. That was a past chapter in my life. I tend to live life driving looking out the windshield these days.

  65. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA May 20, 2012 at 5:45 pm - Reply

    ditto on the salmon – literally just went and stocked up on seafood after hearing the webinar. And got that much more serious about achieving optimal!

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 6:18 pm - Reply

      @Shari I hope you post some photos of the creations with the seafood.

  66. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA May 20, 2012 at 5:45 pm - Reply

    ditto on the salmon – literally just went and stocked up on seafood after hearing the webinar. And got that much more serious about achieving optimal!

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 6:18 pm - Reply

      @Shari I hope you post some photos of the creations with the seafood.

  67. john h May 20, 2012 at 5:58 pm - Reply

    for Jack! Here is a nice article from the Smithsonian on the evolution of whales from land to sea. To an Australian former geo, its rather ironic that some of the fossil record is likely not to far away from Jack’s Clinic. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/How-Did-Whales-Evolve.html?c=y&page=1

    The book may also be interesting Written in Stone: Evolution, the Fossil Record, and Our Place in Nature, by Brian Switek. Copyright 2010.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 6:37 pm - Reply

      @John this particularly struck me in the article, “As strange as modern whales are, their fossil predecessors were even stranger.” This is the thought of the writer because he is not realizing the currency of evolution post KT was the rapid speed of epigenetics to control mammalian survival by power laws mathematics. This is why there are so many mammals with missing links or transitional skeletons. They are rapidly evolved because the currency of the KT extinction used epigentic modifications to guarantee the survival of the animals left standing.

      Moreover, the little known fact that humans have fat that is attached to the skin like whales and other sea mammals is another part of the “aquatic ape” story of hominid evolution. Interestingly enough no primates have this adaptation at all, but we know we came from them out of Africa. It also helps explain why hominid babies are born with the faces away from their mother while primates are born the opposite way. When your brain is small and you are born without any help that makes sense. The help for us may have been other hominids or the water births.

      Another example of a rapid adaptation that may have been fostered by a land water relationship pushed for bipedalism and larger brains because lots of seafood (DHA/EPA) would have been around these primates in Eastern Africa. The strangest part of hominid evolution is that our fossil record is as bad as the whale one appears to have been 100 years ago. It wont surprise me in the least if we find out we rapidly ascended from primates around water.

      Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/How-Did-Whales-Evolve.html#ixzz1vSHPY5RT

  68. Iceman May 20, 2012 at 6:38 pm - Reply

    Once you go down the rabbit hole you can NEVER go back. Thanks for unplugging those who wish to see reality. It’s a whole different world down here.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 6:46 pm - Reply

      @Iceman Many people liked to frame the discussion with me about what they thought I believed or said……I have never once said why I believe in the type of diet I do until this Webinar and this blog post. To get the full essence you need to here it……..but the book goes into it way deeper. This is the rabbit hole I been in for 7 years repairing and reengineering humans using the tools Mother Nature provides all eutherian mammals.

  69. john h May 20, 2012 at 7:01 pm - Reply

    gee Jack, thank you for your ilumination, that is a paradigm changer for me to think through! I hazily remember a National Geo article on Gorilla body fat levels being less than 4%, so they might not have that fat layer under the skin.

    Might have fun shooting the breeze with the author of the book, Brian Switek. Bio- Brian Switek is a freelance science writer and a paleontology research associate at the New Jersey State Museum.http://www.amazon.com/Written-Stone-Evolution-Fossil-Record/dp/1934137294/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1337554766&sr=1-1-catcorr

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 7:05 pm - Reply

      @ John H even in captivity they do not have any sub cutaneous fat that is bound to their skin at all. It is one of those things that people have always known is does not fit with with the story as it stands now. The same thing is true with zonulin. That is the subject of my next series, ironically

  70. john h May 20, 2012 at 7:01 pm - Reply

    gee Jack, thank you for your ilumination, that is a paradigm changer for me to think through! I hazily remember a National Geo article on Gorilla body fat levels being less than 4%, so they might not have that fat layer under the skin.

    Might have fun shooting the breeze with the author of the book, Brian Switek. Bio- Brian Switek is a freelance science writer and a paleontology research associate at the New Jersey State Museum.http://www.amazon.com/Written-Stone-Evolution-Fossil-Record/dp/1934137294/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1337554766&sr=1-1-catcorr

  71. Jerry Malone May 20, 2012 at 7:13 pm - Reply

    @Jack and everyone else: here are two excellent books which I highly recommend:

    http://www.amazon.com/Aquatic-Hypothesis-Condor-Indep-Voices/dp/0285635182/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337558889&sr=1-1

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Scars-Evolution-Elaine-Morgan/dp/0285629964/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_4

    Easy and very enjoyable reading, too.

    The aquatic ape hypothesis makes so much sense, and tells us a lot about how we should be eating and why CT works.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 7:25 pm - Reply

      @Jerry I agree……but it is too bad those who need to think about this to help patients do not.

  72. Jerry Malone May 20, 2012 at 7:13 pm - Reply

    @Jack and everyone else: here are two excellent books which I highly recommend:

    http://www.amazon.com/Aquatic-Hypothesis-Condor-Indep-Voices/dp/0285635182/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337558889&sr=1-1

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Scars-Evolution-Elaine-Morgan/dp/0285629964/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_4

    Easy and very enjoyable reading, too.

    The aquatic ape hypothesis makes so much sense, and tells us a lot about how we should be eating and why CT works.

  73. paulalynn May 20, 2012 at 7:31 pm - Reply

    OMG…I worked with a hematologist/oncologist for 4 years and I can’t wait to get him to read this! Soon as I saw the word “Hemochromatosis” I thought to myself…it is time I draw his attention to this site!

  74. paulalynn May 20, 2012 at 7:31 pm - Reply

    OMG…I worked with a hematologist/oncologist for 4 years and I can’t wait to get him to read this! Soon as I saw the word “Hemochromatosis” I thought to myself…it is time I draw his attention to this site!

  75. Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:20 pm - Reply

    The comments in this blog have more gold in them than most others……..because they are unifying many of the parts of my CT series……they all end in an Evolutionary biology known fact that can not be denied. We have biology, geology, paleobiology, astrophysics, chemistry, and physics all coming together to unify this theory. When CT began you had no idea of the 30,000 ft perspective…….now you are being drawn in to the core event that caused it all……..and it makes a ton of sense. Why? KT happened and we know it and the Age of Mammals begin with that event. The animals that survived it our are deepest ancestors…….and we have the same equipment in us as they did. And my recent TEDx experiment proves that I am correct. Now I am using it to change lives.

  76. Jack May 20, 2012 at 8:20 pm - Reply

    The comments in this blog have more gold in them than most others……..because they are unifying many of the parts of my CT series……they all end in an Evolutionary biology known fact that can not be denied. We have biology, geology, paleobiology, astrophysics, chemistry, and physics all coming together to unify this theory. When CT began you had no idea of the 30,000 ft perspective…….now you are being drawn in to the core event that caused it all……..and it makes a ton of sense. Why? KT happened and we know it and the Age of Mammals begin with that event. The animals that survived it our are deepest ancestors…….and we have the same equipment in us as they did. And my recent TEDx experiment proves that I am correct. Now I am using it to change lives.

  77. Al Alder May 20, 2012 at 9:46 pm - Reply

    Dr K, when will we be able to discuss the practical application of Factor-X in CT? I know there are a lot of rabbit holes there and I just am curious.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 9:52 pm - Reply

      @Al anytime you like.

  78. Al Alder May 20, 2012 at 9:46 pm - Reply

    Dr K, when will we be able to discuss the practical application of Factor-X in CT? I know there are a lot of rabbit holes there and I just am curious.

    • Jack May 20, 2012 at 9:52 pm - Reply

      @Al anytime you like.

  79. Teller Coates May 20, 2012 at 11:39 pm - Reply

    Loved the webinar…starting to see everything through a different lens. Though I wasn’t immediately blown away, after it sunk in and now especially after reading this blog and some of the comments, I am now blown away.

    Watching this through the lens of Factor x, for example…

    http://www.tedmed.com/videos-info?name=David_Blaine_at_TEDMED_2009&q=updated&year=all&sid=33&vid=56

    Fringe? Like Wim Hoff, does he really grasp what he’s doing?! I am loving this…

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 7:07 am - Reply

      @Teller What I shared with you is a radical new viewpoint of how all eutherian mammals were selected for but over 7 yrs as I have developed the theory I have found no reason to abandon it. Moreover, when I have applied it to practice it even shines more. I think we are just scratching the surface of what is possible.

  80. Ruby Kittany May 21, 2012 at 1:33 am - Reply

    Desmond Morris on aquatic apes:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFRYtPQfyCk

  81. Ruby Kittany May 21, 2012 at 1:33 am - Reply

    Desmond Morris on aquatic apes:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFRYtPQfyCk

  82. Maggie May 21, 2012 at 6:31 am - Reply

    I’ve been trying to understand the link between the surviving placental animals and accelerated evolution, and it occurred to me last night that (and this is probably a big doh! to more science-adept people) the environment that the fetus is developing in is the internal environment of the mother and so even though the fetus is somewhat sequestered there is much more impact from the parent’s reaction to the outside environment than would be the case for an animal that develops separately from the mother. Then I found this (I was following the Switek reference that John H put up):

    “Most animal genomes appear to possess ERVs [endogenous retroviruses], yet mammals have a whole class of them not found in any other group of animals. Those appear to be a product of reverse transcription of cellular RNA. Why just mammals? Greg Bear points to a paper discussing a possible evolutionary explanation:

    Viviparous mammals confront an immunological dilemma in that mammals which have highly adaptive immune systems fail to recognize their own allogenic embryos. The relationship of mammalian mother to her fetus resembles that of a parasite and host in that the fetus ‘parasite’ must be able to suppress the immune response of the ‘host’ mother in order to survive. As viviparous mammals are also noteworthy for having genomes that are highly infected with endogenous retroviruses and as retroviruses are generally immunosuppressive, the possible participation of endogenous retroviruses in the immunosuppression by the embryo was then considered. In addition, it was considered if such endogenous viruses might be more broadly involved in the evolution of their host and the resulting host genome that now appear to have many derivatives (such retrotransposons and as LINE elements) of such genomic viruses.”

    http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2006/08/did_a_virus_make_you_smart.php

    The above quoted material is from a blog about Greg Bear’s novel Darwin’s Radio, which I already mentioned.I really recommend the novel. The reviews say the science is very respectable and the story is fascinating.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 6:57 am - Reply

      @Maggie I think I may have to buy this book…….it appears others are getting where I am going. I just got there from the KT event.

  83. Maggie May 21, 2012 at 6:31 am - Reply

    I’ve been trying to understand the link between the surviving placental animals and accelerated evolution, and it occurred to me last night that (and this is probably a big doh! to more science-adept people) the environment that the fetus is developing in is the internal environment of the mother and so even though the fetus is somewhat sequestered there is much more impact from the parent’s reaction to the outside environment than would be the case for an animal that develops separately from the mother. Then I found this (I was following the Switek reference that John H put up):

    “Most animal genomes appear to possess ERVs [endogenous retroviruses], yet mammals have a whole class of them not found in any other group of animals. Those appear to be a product of reverse transcription of cellular RNA. Why just mammals? Greg Bear points to a paper discussing a possible evolutionary explanation:

    Viviparous mammals confront an immunological dilemma in that mammals which have highly adaptive immune systems fail to recognize their own allogenic embryos. The relationship of mammalian mother to her fetus resembles that of a parasite and host in that the fetus ‘parasite’ must be able to suppress the immune response of the ‘host’ mother in order to survive. As viviparous mammals are also noteworthy for having genomes that are highly infected with endogenous retroviruses and as retroviruses are generally immunosuppressive, the possible participation of endogenous retroviruses in the immunosuppression by the embryo was then considered. In addition, it was considered if such endogenous viruses might be more broadly involved in the evolution of their host and the resulting host genome that now appear to have many derivatives (such retrotransposons and as LINE elements) of such genomic viruses.”

    http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2006/08/did_a_virus_make_you_smart.php

    The above quoted material is from a blog about Greg Bear’s novel Darwin’s Radio, which I already mentioned.I really recommend the novel. The reviews say the science is very respectable and the story is fascinating.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 6:57 am - Reply

      @Maggie I think I may have to buy this book…….it appears others are getting where I am going. I just got there from the KT event.

  84. Maggie May 21, 2012 at 7:18 am - Reply

    Jack, it took this blog to illuminate the story for me. I was fascinated but skipped the science part when I read it five years ago. I just thought it would be a fun read for those who are interested.

  85. Maggie May 21, 2012 at 7:32 am - Reply

    P.S. Simultaneous discovery = evolutionary epistemology, right? (“…the evolution of ideas, scientific theories, epistemic norms and culture in general by using models and metaphors drawn from evolutionary biology.” from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/epistemology-evolutionary/)

  86. Maggie May 21, 2012 at 7:32 am - Reply

    P.S. Simultaneous discovery = evolutionary epistemology, right? (“…the evolution of ideas, scientific theories, epistemic norms and culture in general by using models and metaphors drawn from evolutionary biology.” from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/epistemology-evolutionary/)

  87. Kami Kline May 21, 2012 at 10:15 am - Reply

    HI Dr. Kruse, this is interesting to me. I have viruses that my body is not getting rid of. Iron could be an issue with me. How do you diagnose this? I have rather high Ferritin, but the doctors say it is ok. This article leads me to believe that it might just be too high for my body to fight the viruses. Also interesting about the macrophages. Mine must not be working. My doctor wants me to start GcMAF treatments:
    In a healthy person your GcMAF acts as the “commanding officer” of your immune system and also instructs macrophages in your bloodstream to scour our bodies and kill malignancies. But malignant cells like cancer send out an enzyme called Nagalase that neutralises your GcMAF; so the macrophages never get the message to go into action – in this way disease suppresses the immune system, and cancer cells grow unchecked
    http://www.gcmaf.eu/info/
    What tests would you suggest for a person to figure this iron piece of the puzzle out? I just got an ADH tst today plus iron

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 10:54 am - Reply

      @Kami this blog was not really meant to go where you went with it at all……it was meant to show people what we believe today about a disease was not why the adaptation was initially selected for. You question is more direct is about your lack of immune response. A disorder iron issue is one…..but a lowered alpha MSH level is another if it is chronic. Macrophage work best when your iron levels are low. The immune system is fired up when your dehydrated……immunity is also best when you are LS and LR. All of these are factors that acts synergistically.

  88. Eileen May 21, 2012 at 10:56 am - Reply

    Jack:
    I did not sign up for the webinar because I live in Europe and at the time it was broadcast did not have access to wifi. I would love if you could made a recording available for a fee to those of us not in your time zone.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 2:16 pm - Reply

      Eileen I think there are some plans to do some audiobooks ebooks with the webinars down the road.

  89. Eileen May 21, 2012 at 10:56 am - Reply

    Jack:
    I did not sign up for the webinar because I live in Europe and at the time it was broadcast did not have access to wifi. I would love if you could made a recording available for a fee to those of us not in your time zone.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 2:16 pm - Reply

      Eileen I think there are some plans to do some audiobooks ebooks with the webinars down the road.

  90. ray arachelian May 21, 2012 at 3:30 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse, so we know that going into ketosis makes us insulin resistant so as to save some glucose for red blood cells, and some types of brain cells.

    Are you saying that being exposed to extreme cold would make us insulin resistant so as to avoid freezing by raising glucose levels? If so, wouldn’t that cause damage to nerves and eyes and other tissues (which is what insulin helps against)?

    Is there some other mechanism where cold exposure prevents glucose related damage in this case?

    Thanks.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 5:16 pm - Reply

      @Ray We get IR when we eat lots of carbs in late summer and into fall…..this drives us to be IR for a season, namely winter…….the sustained cold reverses it……but the elevated BG levels help you tolerate cold. This is why IR or fat folks love the cold…….but sustained cold causes two things that eventually bring you back to baseline……if you face winter…….One it empties the fat cells and you burn that fat as free heat in the BAT you stimulate from being cold. Two the extra fat cells you have in WAT convert to BAT and they eventually become apoptotic so you eliminate them……as a plastic surgeon would do as winter persists. During winter carbs are not available normally so you would be more prone to ketosis…..longer term int he winter……but the in the cross over from fall to winter as you acclimate to cold the higher BG protects you somewhat from the cold. It is an amazing adaptation that all mammals seem to have but humans seem to think they are immune from. They are not. Since we never face a true winter of hibernation is the deep cold we sustain prolonged diabetes and we now think of it as a disease……when it is meant to be a transitional state that protects us from the cold as the season change.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 5:54 pm - Reply

      @Brian Your email was a real mind bender until I remembered a post on this recently I read somewhere. The ancient climate history for humans can be catalogued now. We have the technology to do it. A russian scientist, Peter Kropotkin first proposed the idea of fresh water under Antarctic ice sheets at the end of the 19th century. He theorized that the tremendous pressure exerted by the cumulative mass of thousands of vertical meters of ice could increase the temperature at the lowest portions of the ice sheet to the point where the ice would melt. Kropotkin’s theory was further developed by Russian glaciologist I.A. Zotikov, who wrote his Ph.D. thesis on this subject in 1967. Russian geographer Andrey Kapitsa used seismic soundings in the region of Vostok Station made during the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1959 and 1964 to measure the thickness of the ice sheet. Kapitsa was the first to suggest the existence of a subglacial lake in the region, and the subsequent research confirmed his hypothesis.

      Lake Vostok is the largest of more than 140 sub-glacial lakes and was recently drilled into by Russian scientists in Antarctica. On February 5th in 2012, a team of Russian scientists claimed to have completed the longest ever ice core of 3,768 m (12,400 ft) and pierced the ice shield to the surface of the lake. We are awaiting what they found. I am very interested in the climatic data it reveals. Samples of the freshly frozen water in the ice well are expected to be collected at the end of 2012 when the new Antarctic summer starts. The Russian team also plans to send a robot into the lake to collect water samples and sediments from the bottom. Unusual forms of life could be found in the lake’s liquid layer that could be millions of years old if my theory about the Cold is correct. Under this glacier is an ecosystem sealed off below the ice for millions of years, conditions which could resemble those of the hypothesized ice-covered ocean of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

      The lake is under complete darkness, under 350 atmospheres (5143 psi) of pressure and expected to be rich in oxygen, so there is speculation that any organisms inhabiting the lake could have evolved in a manner unique to this environment. This means they could live eons because of the concentration of O2 in the water…..a land dweller maybe able to still be alive suspend in this oxygen rich water and its metabolic function slowed so slow that its aging would also be slowed. Think about the movie Abyss to get a visual.

      Africa separated from Antarctica around 160 million years ago prior to KT, followed by the Indian subcontinent, in the early Cretaceous about 125 million years ago. When the KT event occurred about 65 million years ago, Antarctica was then connected to Australia, still had a tropical to subtropical climate, complete with marsupial fauna and an extensive temperate rainforest. We actually may find life left from the KT event. We also will find out if the island buried in this Ancient glacial lakes also are covered with Iridium as the rest of the planet is. The scientific implications are pretty stout.

  91. ray arachelian May 21, 2012 at 3:30 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse, so we know that going into ketosis makes us insulin resistant so as to save some glucose for red blood cells, and some types of brain cells.

    Are you saying that being exposed to extreme cold would make us insulin resistant so as to avoid freezing by raising glucose levels? If so, wouldn’t that cause damage to nerves and eyes and other tissues (which is what insulin helps against)?

    Is there some other mechanism where cold exposure prevents glucose related damage in this case?

    Thanks.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 5:16 pm - Reply

      @Ray We get IR when we eat lots of carbs in late summer and into fall…..this drives us to be IR for a season, namely winter…….the sustained cold reverses it……but the elevated BG levels help you tolerate cold. This is why IR or fat folks love the cold…….but sustained cold causes two things that eventually bring you back to baseline……if you face winter…….One it empties the fat cells and you burn that fat as free heat in the BAT you stimulate from being cold. Two the extra fat cells you have in WAT convert to BAT and they eventually become apoptotic so you eliminate them……as a plastic surgeon would do as winter persists. During winter carbs are not available normally so you would be more prone to ketosis…..longer term int he winter……but the in the cross over from fall to winter as you acclimate to cold the higher BG protects you somewhat from the cold. It is an amazing adaptation that all mammals seem to have but humans seem to think they are immune from. They are not. Since we never face a true winter of hibernation is the deep cold we sustain prolonged diabetes and we now think of it as a disease……when it is meant to be a transitional state that protects us from the cold as the season change.

  92. john h May 21, 2012 at 8:47 pm - Reply

    Dear Jack, very exciting, you know more about this than 99.9% of scientists!

    Likely contamination due to kerosene used for drilling and a new drill using hot water. http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2012/02/07/3424656.htm

    This is a little igloo we could use when we go swimmming in really cold places http://www.icewall.com.au/?p=isc

    Yesterdays webcam down near there at Mawson http://www.antarctica.gov.au/webcams/mawson

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 9:06 pm - Reply

      @John H this is a project that greatly interests me because of my CT series and theories. We always need to be on the look out for things to disprove what we think or believe.

  93. john h May 21, 2012 at 8:47 pm - Reply

    Dear Jack, very exciting, you know more about this than 99.9% of scientists!

    Likely contamination due to kerosene used for drilling and a new drill using hot water. http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2012/02/07/3424656.htm

    This is a little igloo we could use when we go swimmming in really cold places http://www.icewall.com.au/?p=isc

    Yesterdays webcam down near there at Mawson http://www.antarctica.gov.au/webcams/mawson

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 9:06 pm - Reply

      @John H this is a project that greatly interests me because of my CT series and theories. We always need to be on the look out for things to disprove what we think or believe.

  94. Eric Hanner May 21, 2012 at 8:57 pm - Reply

    Jack,
    Today, I turned 64 and I told my wife for my birthday I wanted to go to nearby Lake Michigan and swim. The lake temperature this time of year is 49F (I checked)and air was only 62F. My family obliged me and we all formed on the chilly beachfront. Not a single other person could be seen in the water this morning although many were running or playing in the sand. As I took my CT cold shower last night, I wondered if my CT training was actually going to allow me to take a nice swim in this cold water. Time to put training to the test and take a leap of faith.
    The other members of my family wouldn’t get further than ankles and only for a few seconds, saying it hurt their feet and ankles. I walked out into the waist deep water and dove in. I have to tell you that I was actually shocked at how I was unable to feel any thermal shock at all. I was perfectly comfortable and stayed in the water letting the waves break over my head for over 20 minutes. I was feeling some cold in my lower legs so I decided I would move toward shore and try to find a way to get standing again. I have nerve damage in my lower left leg from a menengieoma 15 years ago and walk with a cane. Getting out of the water was going to be interesting. Eventually I flagged down a passing body builder to help me get my footing in the soft sand. We all soaked up the vitamin D for a while and went to a local restaurant for a big steak. I’m sure this story isn’t remarkable yo you but for me, this is the day I have been waiting for when I could put theory to a test in life. I am now completely convinced that our ancestors being cold adapted were able to survive in conditions we can’t imagine. If I had been in a sinking boat off shore today with a dozen of my Milwaukee neighbors, I think I’m the only one who could swim to safety. Everyone else was paralyzed by the cold while I embraced it. Knowing I have this ability is empowering.

    As a result of my Paleo and CT trials and training, my close family is now following along and I can report my 25 yo son is doing cold showers and searching for fermented veggies and meats while playing sax on a cruise ship in the Mediterranean Sea. My two daughters are both following Paleo and seem interested in understanding how they can control their own health. For me this is the best gift I could get. Knowing my future generations have the ability to break the neolithic treadmill and take control.

    Many years ago I was an athlete and operator in the Para Rescue service of the USAF. Today I am recovering my health and getting in fit condition once again. I feel like I have discovered something powerful. Thanks Jack for all you have done for us who have followed what once seemed like crazy ideas.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 9:11 pm - Reply

      @Eric Thanks for sharing this as you made my night.

  95. Eric Hanner May 21, 2012 at 9:29 pm - Reply

    @Jack,
    My 89yo father has been interested in my CT sessions and asked me if they would work for his foot. He has a calcium build up around his ham string which bothers him occasionally. His Doc suggested a warm pack but I’m thinking maybe a cold water bucket session and maybe supplements? Any ideas what might help this? He’s pretty fit otherwise.

    • Jack May 21, 2012 at 9:53 pm - Reply

      @Eric if he has a calcium build up add magnesium and CT to his regime with TID dosing of Vitamin K2.

  96. Eric Hanner May 21, 2012 at 9:29 pm - Reply

    @Jack,
    My 89yo father has been interested in my CT sessions and asked me if they would work for his foot. He has a calcium build up around his ham string which bothers him occasionally. His Doc suggested a warm pack but I’m thinking maybe a cold water bucket session and maybe supplements? Any ideas what might help this? He’s pretty fit otherwise.

  97. Eric Hanner May 21, 2012 at 10:16 pm - Reply

    Thanks Jack. Help me with what TID means please.

  98. Eric Hanner May 21, 2012 at 10:16 pm - Reply

    Thanks Jack. Help me with what TID means please.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 6:12 am - Reply

      @Eric three times a day =TID

  99. Coriander May 21, 2012 at 10:23 pm - Reply

    Eric, it’s three times per day, but I don’t know what dose Jack intends. I take Carlson K2 5mg, 3 per day.

  100. Coriander May 21, 2012 at 10:23 pm - Reply

    Eric, it’s three times per day, but I don’t know what dose Jack intends. I take Carlson K2 5mg, 3 per day.

  101. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 4:02 am - Reply

    @Jack – On the topic of Ferratin levels and iron — I am curious if you do any type of blood letting yourself. And if you do, or if you recommend it, when would it be done and with what frequency? Other Paleo practioners recommend donating blood every 2-3 months for men.

    Interestingly, there is a centuries old tradition where I live of cupping. It is highly recommended to cup, as it is considered arguably the best currative therapy. It is recommended to cup on the 17th, 19th or 21st of each lunar month.

    Any thoughts?

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 6:19 am - Reply

      @The Kid no I personally dont……but one time I would consider it is if my testosterone went to so high with CT that it drives my HCT to high to increase my blood viscosity. I think cupping works by increasing immune surveillance by inducing soft tissue injury from the cupping. I have zero experience with it but I have a few Russian women who swear by it.

  102. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 4:02 am - Reply

    @Jack – On the topic of Ferratin levels and iron — I am curious if you do any type of blood letting yourself. And if you do, or if you recommend it, when would it be done and with what frequency? Other Paleo practioners recommend donating blood every 2-3 months for men.

    Interestingly, there is a centuries old tradition where I live of cupping. It is highly recommended to cup, as it is considered arguably the best currative therapy. It is recommended to cup on the 17th, 19th or 21st of each lunar month.

    Any thoughts?

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 6:19 am - Reply

      @The Kid no I personally dont……but one time I would consider it is if my testosterone went to so high with CT that it drives my HCT to high to increase my blood viscosity. I think cupping works by increasing immune surveillance by inducing soft tissue injury from the cupping. I have zero experience with it but I have a few Russian women who swear by it.

  103. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 6:23 am - Reply

    @Jack – In light of your revelation of Factor X, I would like to return to a subject I posted in the forum as my theory of what Factor X was: Periodization in Training. Tudor Bompa is the originator of this approach to training and you can find many books out there on the subject. Basically, he uses macro, meso and micro training cycles in order to cover a year of training and preparation for competition.

    I am wondering if you have looked into what I would call “Circadian Periodization of Physical Activity.”

    I started thinking about this again after seeing a comment you made about starting to add carbs back into your diet. And I am wondering if the same approach would be appropriate for exercise, where winter would be more a lazy hibernation, with spring giving way to more activity and summer really ramping up the activity level.

    What do you think? Are humans designed to follow similar seasonal activity levels like other animals do? Thanks.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 6:34 am - Reply

      @The Kid I think humans have to follow the same rules as mammals……we are not exempt from the rules…….we only think we are.

  104. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 6:23 am - Reply

    @Jack – In light of your revelation of Factor X, I would like to return to a subject I posted in the forum as my theory of what Factor X was: Periodization in Training. Tudor Bompa is the originator of this approach to training and you can find many books out there on the subject. Basically, he uses macro, meso and micro training cycles in order to cover a year of training and preparation for competition.

    I am wondering if you have looked into what I would call “Circadian Periodization of Physical Activity.”

    I started thinking about this again after seeing a comment you made about starting to add carbs back into your diet. And I am wondering if the same approach would be appropriate for exercise, where winter would be more a lazy hibernation, with spring giving way to more activity and summer really ramping up the activity level.

    What do you think? Are humans designed to follow similar seasonal activity levels like other animals do? Thanks.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 6:34 am - Reply

      @The Kid I think humans have to follow the same rules as mammals……we are not exempt from the rules…….we only think we are.

  105. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 6:31 am - Reply

    @Jack – Oh, one more thing. When you started adding in carbs to your diet this spring, you said that you knew it was time because you test your blood monthly.

    My assumption is that there is something specific, some marker or set of markers you look for in order to tell you that it is OK to eat more carbs.

    I would like to know what that marker(s) is. And what would be more interesting to know, is whether such a marker would be photosensitive. What chemical levels do we have that either increase/decrease at the change of seasons? And does that chemical increase/decrease then make it “safe” to eat carbs?

    And if our bodies are in proper balance, then I would assume that we should get a natural carb craving once we come out of the cold season. Thus a carb craving would not be a bad thing under the proper cirucmstances. And is there a reason you test to figure out when to eat carbs as opposed to just going with your natural cravings?

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 6:35 am - Reply

      @The kid it is my sex steroid hormone panels and my thyroid panel in concert with my vitamin D status

  106. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 7:21 am - Reply

    @Jack – Are these the goggles you use??

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006TFL39W/

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 9:21 am - Reply

      @TheKid no mine are custom with special coatings. I have tried to find the paperwork on what coating is on them but no luck so far.

  107. TheKid May 22, 2012 at 7:21 am - Reply

    @Jack – Are these the goggles you use??

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006TFL39W/

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 9:21 am - Reply

      @TheKid no mine are custom with special coatings. I have tried to find the paperwork on what coating is on them but no luck so far.

  108. Hari Seldon May 22, 2012 at 8:17 am - Reply

    Hi Jack,

    So now that you’ve added carbs again, are you done with CT or just doing less?

    I’ve recently added some sweet potatoes to my breakfast, and I’m just wondering if I should be as consistent with cold showers and lake dips (Lake Michigan is still about 52-56 degrees). I imagine I’ll keep taking cold showers, but not worry as much about ‘cold-adapting.’

    Thanks.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 9:22 am - Reply

      @Hari right now swimming is the bulk of my CT……in cooler water. I have not used ice in 4 weeks.

  109. Hari Seldon May 22, 2012 at 8:17 am - Reply

    Hi Jack,

    So now that you’ve added carbs again, are you done with CT or just doing less?

    I’ve recently added some sweet potatoes to my breakfast, and I’m just wondering if I should be as consistent with cold showers and lake dips (Lake Michigan is still about 52-56 degrees). I imagine I’ll keep taking cold showers, but not worry as much about ‘cold-adapting.’

    Thanks.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 9:22 am - Reply

      @Hari right now swimming is the bulk of my CT……in cooler water. I have not used ice in 4 weeks.

  110. philippe chouinard May 22, 2012 at 9:00 am - Reply

    Hi
    So interesting!
    Regarding k2 vitamine, is the anti cancer effect real? If so, what could the mecanism, factor x related?

  111. ray arachelian May 22, 2012 at 10:38 am - Reply

    Thanks doc. That makes sense. I take it we should also go VLC and restrict meals to mostly meat to simulate winter foods, I guess, even now in spring.

    Any suggestions for eliminating stored toxins in fat, as the fat releases them? I suspect I have some as I see small rashes that go away quickly after fat loss.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 10:52 am - Reply

      @Ray the best fat release I have found is CT. Nothing comes close in my view.

  112. Hari Seldon May 22, 2012 at 12:09 pm - Reply

    Interesting. Thanks doc.

    How cold of water are we talking? Your lake? What’s it averaging this time of spring?

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 12:59 pm - Reply

      @Hari lately the water has been getting up to 70

  113. Hari Seldon May 22, 2012 at 12:09 pm - Reply

    Interesting. Thanks doc.

    How cold of water are we talking? Your lake? What’s it averaging this time of spring?

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 12:59 pm - Reply

      @Hari lately the water has been getting up to 70

  114. philippe chouinard May 22, 2012 at 7:12 pm - Reply

    Just made a connection..
    Many of my afro-americans are T2D, quite severe with many end-organs problems.
    I’ve always been told during my formation that it was genetic. Is it in fact epigenetic? Never had to endure the cold as much as northen people had and maybe less access to carbohydrate ( less need to) combine with the over consumption of carbs today they simply cannot deal with it.
    Am I understanding right, finally.

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 7:15 pm - Reply

      @Phillippe it is absolutely epigenetic

  115. philippe chouinard May 22, 2012 at 7:12 pm - Reply

    Just made a connection..
    Many of my afro-americans are T2D, quite severe with many end-organs problems.
    I’ve always been told during my formation that it was genetic. Is it in fact epigenetic? Never had to endure the cold as much as northen people had and maybe less access to carbohydrate ( less need to) combine with the over consumption of carbs today they simply cannot deal with it.
    Am I understanding right, finally.

  116. philippe chouinard May 22, 2012 at 7:14 pm - Reply

    I forgot the “parients”, sorry for that

  117. philippe chouinard May 22, 2012 at 7:14 pm - Reply

    I forgot the “parients”, sorry for that

  118. Eric Hanner May 22, 2012 at 7:31 pm - Reply

    Jack,
    Your suggestion of K-2 TID, was that the 100mcg dose or the 10 mg dose? Big difference. Thanks, Eric

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 8:02 pm - Reply

      @ Eric the standard dose is the 100 mcg dose, but if you can source the 5 mgs tablets those would work too. Vitamin K2 is pretty safe as long as your not on coumadin

  119. Eric Hanner May 22, 2012 at 7:31 pm - Reply

    Jack,
    Your suggestion of K-2 TID, was that the 100mcg dose or the 10 mg dose? Big difference. Thanks, Eric

    • Jack May 22, 2012 at 8:02 pm - Reply

      @ Eric the standard dose is the 100 mcg dose, but if you can source the 5 mgs tablets those would work too. Vitamin K2 is pretty safe as long as your not on coumadin

  120. teller May 22, 2012 at 10:20 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse, I know this might be a stretch, but there is one circadian cycle you haven’t mentioned and that’s the lunar cycle. I’m not sure what I’m looking for, but maybe we are entrained to its light or gravity somehow. Any ideas?

    • Jack May 23, 2012 at 7:18 am - Reply

      @Teller I mentioned it in the comments of one of the blogs about growing cycles.

  121. TheKid May 23, 2012 at 6:08 am - Reply

    @Jack – About the goggles, the one’s I noted above do have a special coating (Lexan, I believe) and on another website, it mentions that they block blue light up to 400nm. Maybe that figure will allow you to compare with what you have and use. Is 400nm the number we’re looking for?

  122. TheKid May 23, 2012 at 6:08 am - Reply

    @Jack – About the goggles, the one’s I noted above do have a special coating (Lexan, I believe) and on another website, it mentions that they block blue light up to 400nm. Maybe that figure will allow you to compare with what you have and use. Is 400nm the number we’re looking for?

  123. philippe chouinard May 23, 2012 at 6:49 am - Reply

    Hi The Kid
    I’ve been looking too for bluelight blocking glasses. You should aim for close to 480nm as 400 is the beginning of blue light…uvex have such a model. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum#section_2

  124. philippe chouinard May 23, 2012 at 6:49 am - Reply

    Hi The Kid
    I’ve been looking too for bluelight blocking glasses. You should aim for close to 480nm as 400 is the beginning of blue light…uvex have such a model. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum#section_2

  125. TheKid May 23, 2012 at 7:02 am - Reply

    @Philippe – Are you serious? That means I just blew $60 on goggles. Do you know if there will be any efficacy in using goggles that block up to 400nm, or would it just be a waste of time?

  126. TheKid May 23, 2012 at 7:02 am - Reply

    @Philippe – Are you serious? That means I just blew $60 on goggles. Do you know if there will be any efficacy in using goggles that block up to 400nm, or would it just be a waste of time?

  127. philippe chouinard May 23, 2012 at 8:56 am - Reply

    Just look at the spectrum of visible light and then make your decision. On the lowbluelight site I did not find the detailed specs of their glasses… But they mentioned somewhere about 489nm or something like that…. Hence I am looking to block the blue light and I not si sure about cyan. Moreover, this could explain the relaxing effect my fireplace has on me comparing to those new ecologic neon lights which are surely really blue. By the way, very difficult to get the spectrum from these lights, is there a way to measure it cheaply?

  128. philippe chouinard May 23, 2012 at 8:56 am - Reply

    Just look at the spectrum of visible light and then make your decision. On the lowbluelight site I did not find the detailed specs of their glasses… But they mentioned somewhere about 489nm or something like that…. Hence I am looking to block the blue light and I not si sure about cyan. Moreover, this could explain the relaxing effect my fireplace has on me comparing to those new ecologic neon lights which are surely really blue. By the way, very difficult to get the spectrum from these lights, is there a way to measure it cheaply?

  129. Ryan May 23, 2012 at 9:26 am - Reply

    This post reveals a secret to health (particularly for males with European heritage or post menopausal women) that is missing in the evolutionary medicine prescriptions. If you are male and over 30, you must keep your serum ferritin below 50. You can do this with simple phlebotomy. Total body iron status is critical to health. I will expand more on it later. Jack, I am a fellow 31 year old MD in Dermatology, I dig your blog. Evolutionary medicine is the treatment our patients need for health and longevity. Ryan

    • Jack May 23, 2012 at 5:59 pm - Reply

      @Ryan……yes you can look at the post this way. I was using it as a modern example of how Factor X is still impacting us today. Many illness today we categorize as a disease are infact the result of a evolution using out junk DNA to figure out an ingenous way to cure a serious new problem. What is going on now on the continent of Africa and HIV is today viewed as a disease but I bet within 50 yrs we see a slow down because Mother Nature is catching up using our junk DNA. This is how a sped up epigenetics works.

  130. JanSz May 23, 2012 at 10:00 am - Reply

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003OBZ64M/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00
    Uvex S0360X Ultra-spec 2000 Safety Eyewear, Orange Frame, SCT-Orange UV Extreme Anti-Fog Lens
    Price: $7.84
    ————————
    http://www.amazon.com/review/R366N0EICQH2YC/ref=cm_cr_pr_viewpnt#R366N0EICQH2YC
    These goggles are made by Honeywell, and the SCT-Orange coating is very well documented.

    In the case of SCT-Orange, the tint is designed for use in the dental industry or in other
    industries where UV lamps are used for curing materials such as paints or inks.
    As the chart below demonstrates, SCTOrange offers a wide range of spectral protection.
    It absorbs >99.9% of potentially harmful UVA and UVB radiation.
    It further provides protection by completely absorbing visible light up to 540nm,
    which includes violet, blue and certain green wavelengths of light
    which are emitted by curing lamps. ”

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum#section_2
    Color Frequency Wavelength
    violet 668–789 THz 380–450 nm
    blue 631–668 THz 450–475 nm
    cyan 606–630 THz 476–495 nm
    green 526–606 THz 495–570 nm
    yellow 508–526 THz 570–590 nm
    orange 484–508 THz 590–620 nm
    red 400–484 THz 620–750 nm

    ..

  131. JanSz May 23, 2012 at 10:00 am - Reply

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003OBZ64M/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00
    Uvex S0360X Ultra-spec 2000 Safety Eyewear, Orange Frame, SCT-Orange UV Extreme Anti-Fog Lens
    Price: $7.84
    ————————
    http://www.amazon.com/review/R366N0EICQH2YC/ref=cm_cr_pr_viewpnt#R366N0EICQH2YC
    These goggles are made by Honeywell, and the SCT-Orange coating is very well documented.

    In the case of SCT-Orange, the tint is designed for use in the dental industry or in other
    industries where UV lamps are used for curing materials such as paints or inks.
    As the chart below demonstrates, SCTOrange offers a wide range of spectral protection.
    It absorbs >99.9% of potentially harmful UVA and UVB radiation.
    It further provides protection by completely absorbing visible light up to 540nm,
    which includes violet, blue and certain green wavelengths of light
    which are emitted by curing lamps. ”

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum#section_2
    Color Frequency Wavelength
    violet 668–789 THz 380–450 nm
    blue 631–668 THz 450–475 nm
    cyan 606–630 THz 476–495 nm
    green 526–606 THz 495–570 nm
    yellow 508–526 THz 570–590 nm
    orange 484–508 THz 590–620 nm
    red 400–484 THz 620–750 nm

    ..

  132. john h May 23, 2012 at 7:29 pm - Reply

    @ Hi Jack , this may or may not be useful or trigger a more useful line of thought….

    came across this Japanese simple method to balance the para and sympathetic nerve tone, that only appears to work in those (that I assume to be) leptin resistant.
    It triggers some thoughts in my mind about about the cartoon of our evolution to becoming biped and of the stoop of current homo sapiens sedentary. Its idea seems to be in your patch of the brain woods!

    https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/biomedres/31/4/31_4_259/_pdf

  133. john h May 23, 2012 at 7:29 pm - Reply

    @ Hi Jack , this may or may not be useful or trigger a more useful line of thought….

    came across this Japanese simple method to balance the para and sympathetic nerve tone, that only appears to work in those (that I assume to be) leptin resistant.
    It triggers some thoughts in my mind about about the cartoon of our evolution to becoming biped and of the stoop of current homo sapiens sedentary. Its idea seems to be in your patch of the brain woods!

    https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/biomedres/31/4/31_4_259/_pdf

    • Jack May 24, 2012 at 7:16 am - Reply

      @John H I have used this before with kettle bells however to increase my sympathetic tone to decrease my parasympathetic tone but the experiment only last a month and the results were equivocal. I should write about it though……it was interesting. Maybe I should just get rid of the kettlebell?

  134. Susan Moles May 23, 2012 at 9:16 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse,

    I have read your posts on osteoporosis twice (I have read all of your posts along with ALL the comments:)) and I am looking for advice. I have been grain free for three years and wheat free for over three years. No sugars, no seed oils and mostly primal with the exception of probably a little more cheese than is optimal. I have recently received the results of my bone scan using the Hologic Discovery? The lumbar spine L1-L4 and left hip were elevated. The findings are for the lumbar spine a T-score of -1.9 and a left hip score of -1.0

    I have had osteopenia since I was in my early 40’s, and I was on bio hormone therapy for ten years after which time I stopped the hormone on the suggestion of my pharmacist. In addition to the magnesium, vitamin D3, CoQ10, B vitamins, and krill oil I have upped my K2 (MK-4) from 5mg to 40mg split into two doses. Having cut back on dairy for the past six months, should I up my dairy again and start taking calcium supplements again? Even though I have read your posts, I still have trouble retaining all
    the information you so graciously supply. I have also begun using a ten pound kettle bell. I will up the weight
    on the bell when I have proper control of the ten pounder.

    In my 40’s I used Fosamax for just about a year, when at that point I began to have trouble swallowing. I promptly quite that therapy, and decided to take my chances. I absolutely will not go back on a bio-phosphate, but I am determined to keep my bones from turning into dust before they are meant to.

    Thank you in advance for any suggestions you may send my way.

    Susan M.

  135. Susan Moles May 23, 2012 at 9:16 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse,

    I have read your posts on osteoporosis twice (I have read all of your posts along with ALL the comments:)) and I am looking for advice. I have been grain free for three years and wheat free for over three years. No sugars, no seed oils and mostly primal with the exception of probably a little more cheese than is optimal. I have recently received the results of my bone scan using the Hologic Discovery? The lumbar spine L1-L4 and left hip were elevated. The findings are for the lumbar spine a T-score of -1.9 and a left hip score of -1.0

    I have had osteopenia since I was in my early 40’s, and I was on bio hormone therapy for ten years after which time I stopped the hormone on the suggestion of my pharmacist. In addition to the magnesium, vitamin D3, CoQ10, B vitamins, and krill oil I have upped my K2 (MK-4) from 5mg to 40mg split into two doses. Having cut back on dairy for the past six months, should I up my dairy again and start taking calcium supplements again? Even though I have read your posts, I still have trouble retaining all
    the information you so graciously supply. I have also begun using a ten pound kettle bell. I will up the weight
    on the bell when I have proper control of the ten pounder.

    In my 40’s I used Fosamax for just about a year, when at that point I began to have trouble swallowing. I promptly quite that therapy, and decided to take my chances. I absolutely will not go back on a bio-phosphate, but I am determined to keep my bones from turning into dust before they are meant to.

    Thank you in advance for any suggestions you may send my way.

    Susan M.

  136. Dali Dula May 24, 2012 at 6:42 am - Reply
  137. Dali Dula May 24, 2012 at 6:42 am - Reply
  138. Justin Rippy May 24, 2012 at 7:55 am - Reply

    Get rid of the kettlebell.

  139. Justin Rippy May 24, 2012 at 7:55 am - Reply

    Get rid of the kettlebell.

  140. Ron May 24, 2012 at 8:33 am - Reply

    Jack: could you please delete my comment #150. I didn’t know it was going to show my last name. I have corrected my settings to prevent this on future posts. Thanks

  141. Ron May 24, 2012 at 8:33 am - Reply

    Jack: could you please delete my comment #150. I didn’t know it was going to show my last name. I have corrected my settings to prevent this on future posts. Thanks

  142. skinnycrisps May 24, 2012 at 11:27 pm - Reply

    Hi Dr.K,
    I have been waiting to report on my results as I have been following your protocols since I started at the beginning of your blogs; eating paleo, taking the supplements, using yellow glasses at night, wearing cold packs around my abdomen five evenings a week, etc. Well, I have to report a few things that have changed (I am 67 female- 119 lbs but want to be 108): The most surprising thing is my hair growth!! I have had very thin hair with receeded hairline at forehead corners for 40 years, which occurred after childbirth- well now I have lovely longish strands growing and filling in those areas and very apparent thickening all over my scalp. I am truly astounded! Next,I have needed to take something to make me fall asleep every night,as I couldn’t get to sleep before 1:30 a.m.and needed something to “turn me off”. But I have been able to taper off the meds, as now I wear the yellow glasses every night and find I get really sleepy around 11:00 and have been able to fall asleep naturally the past few nights. I now eat bacon and eggs for breakfast with bulletproof coffee and am satisfied all day until 7 p.m. and eat paleo dinner( grassfed meat, fish, sweet potatoes/ yams-occasionally and home made pickled items, mushrooms and cabbage. I never ate breakfast before. I had tried a couple of rounds of HCG, and although I lost the weight, I lost my butt, leg shape and muscle tone. After following your protocol, I have curves on my butt, more shape in my legs and a flatter stomach and generally have a much calmer feeling daily even though I run a growing business which I started at age 64. Although I have not stepped up my exercise, these physical changes have occurred on their own. I take K2, D3, Resvertol, Mag Malate, CoQ10 with L- Carnitine and Biotin,C,and a bunch of other reccommended supps which I keep in a bowl on my desk and get them down as I work through the day. I’m never tired and have amazing energy and think the yellow glasses are key to my being able to wind down. I have forwarded your blogs to all that I feel would be open to it and slowly some are seeing results. My son-in-law is aound 400 lbs now (he was heavier) and I think he’s started to notice some of the things I send him to read, because he has lost 35 pounds in a few weeks- he is 6’5″ , and although his knees have been taking a beating, my daughter says there is some relief occurring there.
    On another note, this week I sent a cooling apparatus called the Thermal Hood to your office. I hope you had a chance to look at it and possibly find this a valuable item for chemo, migraine treatment, neck and head surgery etc. If you want further information all the contacts were in the shipment.
    I have to thank you again for the real deal prescription to optimal. You have put all the puzzle pieces out there for all of us, and if we put them together the big picture can be one of robust health that will make our journey through life more joyful.
    Your blog is the best reality show that exists. The sharing community here is intelligent and caring. A true blessing to have discovered you. I’m always waitng for your next “episode”:)

    • Jack May 25, 2012 at 6:50 am - Reply

      @Skinny crisps. I got the hood yesterday (thank you very much) and I used it on someone who just had a craniotomy with headache…….so far the results are solid. I may have my MM contact you about adding the product to our recommended list. I really appreciate the kind words in your post. Hari growth is pretty common among older women. I would tell you if your hair is growing I think you might want to consider getting a kettlebell and learning how to swing it…….nothing gives a lady her curves back like the kettle bell swing. Just make sure its heavy enough. You should struggle to swing it the first time.

  143. skinnycrisps May 24, 2012 at 11:27 pm - Reply

    Hi Dr.K,
    I have been waiting to report on my results as I have been following your protocols since I started at the beginning of your blogs; eating paleo, taking the supplements, using yellow glasses at night, wearing cold packs around my abdomen five evenings a week, etc. Well, I have to report a few things that have changed (I am 67 female- 119 lbs but want to be 108): The most surprising thing is my hair growth!! I have had very thin hair with receeded hairline at forehead corners for 40 years, which occurred after childbirth- well now I have lovely longish strands growing and filling in those areas and very apparent thickening all over my scalp. I am truly astounded! Next,I have needed to take something to make me fall asleep every night,as I couldn’t get to sleep before 1:30 a.m.and needed something to “turn me off”. But I have been able to taper off the meds, as now I wear the yellow glasses every night and find I get really sleepy around 11:00 and have been able to fall asleep naturally the past few nights. I now eat bacon and eggs for breakfast with bulletproof coffee and am satisfied all day until 7 p.m. and eat paleo dinner( grassfed meat, fish, sweet potatoes/ yams-occasionally and home made pickled items, mushrooms and cabbage. I never ate breakfast before. I had tried a couple of rounds of HCG, and although I lost the weight, I lost my butt, leg shape and muscle tone. After following your protocol, I have curves on my butt, more shape in my legs and a flatter stomach and generally have a much calmer feeling daily even though I run a growing business which I started at age 64. Although I have not stepped up my exercise, these physical changes have occurred on their own. I take K2, D3, Resvertol, Mag Malate, CoQ10 with L- Carnitine and Biotin,C,and a bunch of other reccommended supps which I keep in a bowl on my desk and get them down as I work through the day. I’m never tired and have amazing energy and think the yellow glasses are key to my being able to wind down. I have forwarded your blogs to all that I feel would be open to it and slowly some are seeing results. My son-in-law is aound 400 lbs now (he was heavier) and I think he’s started to notice some of the things I send him to read, because he has lost 35 pounds in a few weeks- he is 6’5″ , and although his knees have been taking a beating, my daughter says there is some relief occurring there.
    On another note, this week I sent a cooling apparatus called the Thermal Hood to your office. I hope you had a chance to look at it and possibly find this a valuable item for chemo, migraine treatment, neck and head surgery etc. If you want further information all the contacts were in the shipment.
    I have to thank you again for the real deal prescription to optimal. You have put all the puzzle pieces out there for all of us, and if we put them together the big picture can be one of robust health that will make our journey through life more joyful.
    Your blog is the best reality show that exists. The sharing community here is intelligent and caring. A true blessing to have discovered you. I’m always waitng for your next “episode”:)

  144. Dali Dula May 25, 2012 at 6:58 am - Reply

    I posted this over on the benefits of CT thread, but it’s so much fun I’m putting it here also:

    I woke up today with a FBG of 86!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Diagnosed 3 yrs ago with an a1c of 13. Went paleo 1 year ago. Started leptin reset nov 2011,started ct in feb 12. CT everyday. Not taking any diabetes meds. 86 bitch, take that you f,ing diabetes! Thank you Dr. Kruse, you are the man! Oh, I’m also ripped and in the best shape of my life at 51. Ha. Hahahahahahahahaha! Bring on summer.

    • Jack May 25, 2012 at 7:04 am - Reply

      @Dali Dula Thanks for making my weekend!!! I apologize that I am made entirely of flaws. The best part is I am sutured and stapled together with good intentions as I work to find out what makes us tick. Singular focus and singular mind.

  145. Dali Dula May 25, 2012 at 6:58 am - Reply

    I posted this over on the benefits of CT thread, but it’s so much fun I’m putting it here also:

    I woke up today with a FBG of 86!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Diagnosed 3 yrs ago with an a1c of 13. Went paleo 1 year ago. Started leptin reset nov 2011,started ct in feb 12. CT everyday. Not taking any diabetes meds. 86 bitch, take that you f,ing diabetes! Thank you Dr. Kruse, you are the man! Oh, I’m also ripped and in the best shape of my life at 51. Ha. Hahahahahahahahaha! Bring on summer.

  146. Dali Dula May 25, 2012 at 7:07 am - Reply

    No, Jack, thank you for making the rest of my life.

  147. Dali Dula May 25, 2012 at 7:07 am - Reply

    No, Jack, thank you for making the rest of my life.

  148. Eric Hanner May 25, 2012 at 9:32 am - Reply

    @Dali Dula,
    Your results are impressive! I am in a similar situation with T2D and A1C starting high. Would you share the steps you used to get yourself off the diabetes meds? I take Metformin and have been on Glipizide. I stopped the Glipizide over 2 Months and after a brief rise my daily bs numbers have come down to 85-110 levels. Were you able to abruptly drop them all? Thanks in advance.
    Eric

  149. Eric Hanner May 25, 2012 at 9:32 am - Reply

    @Dali Dula,
    Your results are impressive! I am in a similar situation with T2D and A1C starting high. Would you share the steps you used to get yourself off the diabetes meds? I take Metformin and have been on Glipizide. I stopped the Glipizide over 2 Months and after a brief rise my daily bs numbers have come down to 85-110 levels. Were you able to abruptly drop them all? Thanks in advance.
    Eric

  150. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 10:18 am - Reply

    Hi Skinnycrisps, I remember you posting a while back. Congratulations! So nice to get the sleep you need. Those glasses are really amazing, aren’t they? Nice to hear about the hair, muscles, energy. And your son-in-law! That’s the best news of all! 🙂 Thanks for giving us this update!

  151. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 10:21 am - Reply

    Dali, great news! I’ve been watching your exciting progress. Couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy.

  152. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 10:21 am - Reply

    Dali, great news! I’ve been watching your exciting progress. Couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy.

  153. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 10:25 am - Reply

    Dali Dula, have you created a journal on the forum? Your story would be a great inspiration. You could collect your various posts and consolidate them.

  154. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 10:25 am - Reply

    Dali Dula, have you created a journal on the forum? Your story would be a great inspiration. You could collect your various posts and consolidate them.

  155. Susan Moles May 25, 2012 at 11:32 am - Reply

    I love all of you folks that take the time to comment here! As much as I glean from Dr. Kruse’s blogs, which is huge, I also get a boatload of good information and vibes from all of you great people. It is truly amazing, the information you learn here, especially about how to look at old problems in new ways. I never thought my interests would run in this direction! I never thought I would be fascinated about bio-chemistry. I tried to avoid the very dry study of science while going to school. This blog site has made it so very interesting that it has floored me that I am actually interested, at 59 to finally want to learn.

    This is such a pleasant and respectful place to come for people who are really trying to fix themselves or keep themselves fit. Thank you all so very much!

    Susan M.

  156. Susan Moles May 25, 2012 at 11:32 am - Reply

    I love all of you folks that take the time to comment here! As much as I glean from Dr. Kruse’s blogs, which is huge, I also get a boatload of good information and vibes from all of you great people. It is truly amazing, the information you learn here, especially about how to look at old problems in new ways. I never thought my interests would run in this direction! I never thought I would be fascinated about bio-chemistry. I tried to avoid the very dry study of science while going to school. This blog site has made it so very interesting that it has floored me that I am actually interested, at 59 to finally want to learn.

    This is such a pleasant and respectful place to come for people who are really trying to fix themselves or keep themselves fit. Thank you all so very much!

    Susan M.

  157. chewingthefat May 25, 2012 at 11:37 am - Reply

    Jack, I learn so much from you. I’ve done a large amount of research on leaky gut and celiac and I always come back to you. I wasn’t able to see the webinar, but I think I have a good idea of where you are going. I had a flash today when viewing info on zonulin…do you think mycoplasma may have some influence on the difference in zonulin levels with celiacs (with high zonulin, but no recent exposure) and gluten-sensitive, non-celiacs (with low zonulin, with recent exposure)? I am a celiac with Hashimoto’s. I’ve been gluten-free for almost 2 years. The last blood test a month ago showed a doubled increase in my anti-bodies. It should’ve shown a decrease with the supposed gut-healing that would occur with a gluten-free (and largely paleo) diet. The ND did a blood test for mycoplasma and it was positive. Just trying to put this all together…

    • Jack May 25, 2012 at 3:44 pm - Reply

      @Laura I do think many infections not just mycoplasma can do this because of antigen processing……our gut compared to primate guts are designed to be more leaky to allow the gut microbiota and the immune system to co evolve and allow for faster assimilation of fats like DHA and EPA to fuel brain growth…….with a shorter gut. The trade off is it make us more susceptible to AI disease and gut infections that cause many newer biologic problems…….Many people do not even know that primates do not have zonulin……and we do.

  158. chewingthefat May 25, 2012 at 11:37 am - Reply

    Jack, I learn so much from you. I’ve done a large amount of research on leaky gut and celiac and I always come back to you. I wasn’t able to see the webinar, but I think I have a good idea of where you are going. I had a flash today when viewing info on zonulin…do you think mycoplasma may have some influence on the difference in zonulin levels with celiacs (with high zonulin, but no recent exposure) and gluten-sensitive, non-celiacs (with low zonulin, with recent exposure)? I am a celiac with Hashimoto’s. I’ve been gluten-free for almost 2 years. The last blood test a month ago showed a doubled increase in my anti-bodies. It should’ve shown a decrease with the supposed gut-healing that would occur with a gluten-free (and largely paleo) diet. The ND did a blood test for mycoplasma and it was positive. Just trying to put this all together…

    • Jack May 25, 2012 at 3:44 pm - Reply

      @Laura I do think many infections not just mycoplasma can do this because of antigen processing……our gut compared to primate guts are designed to be more leaky to allow the gut microbiota and the immune system to co evolve and allow for faster assimilation of fats like DHA and EPA to fuel brain growth…….with a shorter gut. The trade off is it make us more susceptible to AI disease and gut infections that cause many newer biologic problems…….Many people do not even know that primates do not have zonulin……and we do.

  159. chewingthefat May 25, 2012 at 11:44 am - Reply

    I’m another person who did not realize that my name would be shown in the comment…could you not publish it and I’ll send it again with my user name? Thanks.

  160. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 2:10 pm - Reply

    Hi Susan M. Have you tried any CT for your osteopenia? Sounds like your diet and exercise is good. Several folks in the forum have had great success with bone and joint problems, using CT.

  161. Nonchalant May 25, 2012 at 2:10 pm - Reply

    Hi Susan M. Have you tried any CT for your osteopenia? Sounds like your diet and exercise is good. Several folks in the forum have had great success with bone and joint problems, using CT.

  162. Tim Francis May 25, 2012 at 4:07 pm - Reply

    Dr. Kruse,

    Do you see much false high HS-CRP in your practice? I have heard to not test for it when you are ill (cold or flu) because it can be off by a large amount.

    The Best

    Conan

    • Jack May 25, 2012 at 4:26 pm - Reply

      @Tim it does happen about one in 20…….if a test comes back that just seems hard to fathom I repeat it.

  163. pete el May 25, 2012 at 6:11 pm - Reply

    What’s the hype about the Goggles? Why should we wear them and where do I get them? Thanks, Pete

  164. pete el May 25, 2012 at 6:11 pm - Reply

    What’s the hype about the Goggles? Why should we wear them and where do I get them? Thanks, Pete

  165. Terry Fischer May 25, 2012 at 6:26 pm - Reply

    @skinnycrisps, appreciate input from another agemate. My hair has been one of the banes of my existence. I’ll redouble my efforts.

    @Dali Dula, your exuberance says it all, congrats!

  166. Terry Fischer May 25, 2012 at 6:26 pm - Reply

    @skinnycrisps, appreciate input from another agemate. My hair has been one of the banes of my existence. I’ll redouble my efforts.

    @Dali Dula, your exuberance says it all, congrats!

  167. Susan Moles May 25, 2012 at 8:33 pm - Reply

    Hi Nonchalant,

    Thanks for the input.

    When the CT posts first came out I was in the tub within a week. I did a week of the face plunges first and then I went straight to a 52 degree (average) 40 minutes soak up to my waist for about 30 days in a row. Then I started slacking off to only doing a few times a week. Since spring is here in the Inland Northwest, I decided to allot the extra time to much needed yard work. I think I will at least start icing my waist again for the benefit of the CT. My main confusion is in the consumption of dairy to improve my bones. Is it even necessary? Is extra dairy consumption going to help or hinder the process of rebuilding and retaining bones? I quit taking any form of supplemental calcium, except for what is in my B-complex tablet, as kidney stones tend to run in my family. I took CAL/Mag tablets for years and never noticed any improvement in my bone health. I am also wondering if I did permanent damage to my bone health when I was on Fosomax for a year. I am really fortunate that this is the only health marker that I am concerned with at the moment.

    • Jack May 25, 2012 at 8:42 pm - Reply

      @Susan No dairy……eat animal fat and protein…….not their milk. No calcium…….take Magnesium. I like Mg malate or threonate best.
      The next best step is to look into bioidentical hormone replacement……..avoid the drugs in the bisphosphonate class.

  168. Susan Moles May 25, 2012 at 9:46 pm - Reply

    Jack,

    Thanks for the response. Back to no dairy it is. When I can, I will get the hormones re-evaluated to see if I should go back on the replacement therapy. Again, thanks for caring.

    Susan M.

  169. Susan Moles May 25, 2012 at 9:46 pm - Reply

    Jack,

    Thanks for the response. Back to no dairy it is. When I can, I will get the hormones re-evaluated to see if I should go back on the replacement therapy. Again, thanks for caring.

    Susan M.

  170. TheKid May 26, 2012 at 5:30 am - Reply

    @Jack – I don’t usually have much to report in terms of progress, at least not like some of the folks. But I noticed something small I thought I would share.

    In the recent weeks, I have been feeling like I should exercise. I stopped working out altogether some time ago in order to get myself healthy enough to be able to tolerate exercise. I did swing my kettlebell about a week and a half ago and that made me terribly sore, so I eased off again.

    But today at about 12:30 I had this urge to move. I don’t know why. Maybe it’s because I’ve kicked CT up a notch the past few days after more sporadic use of CT the last 2 weeks. Not sure. I had my large breakfast at 7:30 am and did not feel hungry by lunch. But I surely did feel like I wanted to move.

    And I don’t mean that I felt I’d like to go outside and go for a short walk. No, I mean that I felt like I wanted to run. The urge continued to build to the point that I felt I had to do something. So I went down the the parking garage of my building, and proceeded to do a few light jogs to warmup, 4 sets of 20 lunges, and 4 nice build-up sprints. All that with my tie still on.

    IT … FELT … GREAT!

    Barely broke a sweat. Didn’t collapse a lung. Hopefully more where that came from soon. Thanks Jack.

    • Jack May 26, 2012 at 7:52 am - Reply

      @Thekid. You are making progress. Awesome!

  171. TheKid May 26, 2012 at 5:40 am - Reply

    Found another option for evening blue blocking eyewear. See the link below. These might be helpful for some since they are designed to fit over prescription eyeglasses.

    http://www.cocoonseyewear.com/sunwear/category.php?id=53

    ORANGE
    • Maximizes contrast enhancement
    • Improve object definition and clarity
    • Filter allows 34% LT
    • 100% UVA/UVB protection
    • Blocks 100%of blue light
    • Blocks visible light up to 520 nm

  172. TheKid May 26, 2012 at 5:40 am - Reply

    Found another option for evening blue blocking eyewear. See the link below. These might be helpful for some since they are designed to fit over prescription eyeglasses.

    http://www.cocoonseyewear.com/sunwear/category.php?id=53

    ORANGE
    • Maximizes contrast enhancement
    • Improve object definition and clarity
    • Filter allows 34% LT
    • 100% UVA/UVB protection
    • Blocks 100%of blue light
    • Blocks visible light up to 520 nm

  173. TheKid May 26, 2012 at 8:38 am - Reply

    @Jack – I read that you take 4000mg of Resveratrol daily. Did you titrate up to that amount, or just jump in feet first at 4000mg? Mine just came in the mail today(Biotiva Transmax 500mg). I only really have enough right now to be able to take 1000mg daily for 30 days. Will that deliver the intended impact? Or do I need more? And also, when should it be taken to be most effective? (morning/night? before/after meals? before/after exercise?) Thanks.

    • Jack May 26, 2012 at 9:12 am - Reply

      @TheKid Yes I titrate it up in long light cycles.

  174. TheKid May 26, 2012 at 8:38 am - Reply

    @Jack – I read that you take 4000mg of Resveratrol daily. Did you titrate up to that amount, or just jump in feet first at 4000mg? Mine just came in the mail today(Biotiva Transmax 500mg). I only really have enough right now to be able to take 1000mg daily for 30 days. Will that deliver the intended impact? Or do I need more? And also, when should it be taken to be most effective? (morning/night? before/after meals? before/after exercise?) Thanks.

    • Jack May 26, 2012 at 9:12 am - Reply

      @TheKid Yes I titrate it up in long light cycles.

  175. ATL_Paleo May 26, 2012 at 11:00 am - Reply

    @ TheKid … several months ago I bought the ‘Orange’ version of Cocoons eyewear for about $ 37 USD w/ shipping. I highly recommend them. The blue light disappears using the ‘CD light test’. Last week I tried an experiment of not using my Cocoons and surfing the web until bedtime. Wow … my sleep was much worse both of those nights. That is even with FLux on my computer. In my N=1, a good pair of blue blocking glasses is probably 10 to 20 times more valuable than just FLux alone on a big LCD screen. I am a true believer in the importance of blocking blue light after sunset. Thanks Dr Kruse.

    • Jack May 26, 2012 at 3:28 pm - Reply

      @The Kid and Atl Paleo I cant find my receipt on my Oakleys to tell you what they put on them…….but they block it all.

  176. skinnycrisps May 26, 2012 at 4:25 pm - Reply

    @Nonchalant
    Here is the link for the blue blockers I bought on E-Bay. They were so inexpensive I bought a few pairs. They are very light weight and the lenses are nice and have no distortion. The first pair I had bought were wrap around and they were cheap plastic and already have scratches on them so I’m glad I found these.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Aviator-Sunglasses-Amber-Blue-Blocker-Driving-Lens-/280669313541?pt=US_Sunglasses&hash=item415931da05

  177. skinnycrisps May 26, 2012 at 4:34 pm - Reply

    @ terry fischer
    This is my prescription for my hair growth:
    I take Viviscal one tab in am and one in pm: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MVQOKM/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i00

    Natural Factors brand Biosil
    Now brand Biotin 5000 mcgs

    Alomg with all the other things that Dr. Kruse recommends.

  178. skinnycrisps May 26, 2012 at 4:34 pm - Reply

    @ terry fischer
    This is my prescription for my hair growth:
    I take Viviscal one tab in am and one in pm: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MVQOKM/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i00

    Natural Factors brand Biosil
    Now brand Biotin 5000 mcgs

    Alomg with all the other things that Dr. Kruse recommends.

  179. skinnycrisps May 26, 2012 at 4:47 pm - Reply

    Dear Dr. Kruse,
    I am so elated that you found positive results from the Thermal Hood on your surgical patient. It is actually my son who developed this poduct and due to economical reasons it was put on the back burner for a couple of years! We are now moving forward with production and we thank you for trying it and giving it a good evaluation.
    I don’t expect you to post this as I’m not using this forum for pesonal gain. We are happy that it could help your patient with pain management and healing.
    Sincerely, Myrna Mirow

  180. skinnycrisps May 26, 2012 at 4:47 pm - Reply

    Dear Dr. Kruse,
    I am so elated that you found positive results from the Thermal Hood on your surgical patient. It is actually my son who developed this poduct and due to economical reasons it was put on the back burner for a couple of years! We are now moving forward with production and we thank you for trying it and giving it a good evaluation.
    I don’t expect you to post this as I’m not using this forum for pesonal gain. We are happy that it could help your patient with pain management and healing.
    Sincerely, Myrna Mirow

  181. Terry F May 27, 2012 at 12:08 am - Reply

    @skinnycrisps. got it thanks for the info

  182. Terry F May 27, 2012 at 12:08 am - Reply

    @skinnycrisps. got it thanks for the info

  183. Dali Dula May 27, 2012 at 9:18 am - Reply

    @ the kid expect more of this uncontrollable urge to move. Sometimes I just feel really good and I have to run. Sometimes I sprint really fast wherever I am which freaks people out if it’s a public place. They look around to see who’s chasing me. Fun.

  184. Dali Dula May 27, 2012 at 9:18 am - Reply

    @ the kid expect more of this uncontrollable urge to move. Sometimes I just feel really good and I have to run. Sometimes I sprint really fast wherever I am which freaks people out if it’s a public place. They look around to see who’s chasing me. Fun.

  185. Jerry Malone May 27, 2012 at 4:04 pm - Reply

    @Jack, Since starting the LR in Jan., my BG has become lower and much more stable. Usually fasting level is in the 80s now. (Sleeping in pitch black and getting to bed early seem to be the biggest factors influencing waking BG.)

    When I added CT 4 weeks ago, I was amazed to find that it has an almost immediate effect on BG. Strange thing is that my BG sometimes mysteriously creeps up in the afternoon, usually on days when I’m either very bored or under a lot of stress.

    Today, for example, it went up to 115. Thought I’d use this opportunity to do an experiment. I soaked in the CT tank (70 deg. F.) and took BG readings at 10 minutes and 25 minutes. At 10 minutes, BG was 89. At 25 minutes, it was 83. (I took care to thoroughly dry my finger, and averaged several readings; used a TrueTrack meter, which seems to have less noise than others.)

    I’m amazed at: 1) how big of a drop in BG I get from CT, 2) how fast it occurs, and 3) the effectiveness of even relatively warm (70 deg.) water.

    How does CT work to lower BG? Does it cause an insulin spike, or is it working through some other mechanism?

    Thanks.

    • Jack May 27, 2012 at 6:38 pm - Reply

      @Jerry it has to do with a protein that leptin affects in the brain in a place called the hypothalamus. The protein that does it is TXNIP. TXNIP is pure hypothalamic protein that is heavily influenced by leptin and overall energy status. When hypothalamic expressing neurons secrete TXNIP is completely alters the calorie in and calorie out dogma that exists today and completely fits in alignment with what I have believed for many years now. The brain has a way to calculate overall energy status and it can regulate consumption and metabolic efficiency. Humans wrongly believe the best way to lose weight is stop eating and cut calories. This is wrong, and it is the worse thing one can do. The best way to modulate the system is affect the metabolic pathways efficiencies. If you are more metabolically efficient you can burn way more than you take in and still be lean. TXNIP allows humans to do just that. The lower TXNIP is the more efficient is our Ferrari engines.

      The major plays are BG, insulin and leptin status. Interestingly enough the latest research is beginning to show it is not a shared thermostat with all three players getting equal footing. It appears leptin is the major player and this make tremendous sense because insulin is a small player in colder temperatures because carbs are not supposed to available to us in the Cold as I laid out clearly in CT-6 by showing you how our brain is wired for cold. It is different than it is warm……..

      The lower energy expenditure in hTXNIP-expressing neurons means we get fatter because metabolism is slowed down centrally. The interesting part of TXNIP is that is also shows why body builders were way ahead of the game and why IFing really works. The IFing using TXNIP science however calls for a different feeding protocol……that some body builders are using. Insulin spikes will also alter TXNIP to induce lipolysis.

      This is why in CT 12 I was going to the low carbers on Jimmy Moore’s cruise that all you believe has to be challenged. Not all carbs are bad when they are eaten at the correct times of the seasons. Summer time carbs when it is warm can actually lean us out and the science of TXNIP is the proof of that concept.

      What CT does to TXNIP is lowers it tremendously via the effect on leptin and BG. This is why CT is massive help to obesity and to FBG. Most people in the blogosphere do not even realize this science exists and now you do.

  186. Jerry Malone May 27, 2012 at 4:04 pm - Reply

    @Jack, Since starting the LR in Jan., my BG has become lower and much more stable. Usually fasting level is in the 80s now. (Sleeping in pitch black and getting to bed early seem to be the biggest factors influencing waking BG.)

    When I added CT 4 weeks ago, I was amazed to find that it has an almost immediate effect on BG. Strange thing is that my BG sometimes mysteriously creeps up in the afternoon, usually on days when I’m either very bored or under a lot of stress.

    Today, for example, it went up to 115. Thought I’d use this opportunity to do an experiment. I soaked in the CT tank (70 deg. F.) and took BG readings at 10 minutes and 25 minutes. At 10 minutes, BG was 89. At 25 minutes, it was 83. (I took care to thoroughly dry my finger, and averaged several readings; used a TrueTrack meter, which seems to have less noise than others.)

    I’m amazed at: 1) how big of a drop in BG I get from CT, 2) how fast it occurs, and 3) the effectiveness of even relatively warm (70 deg.) water.

    How does CT work to lower BG? Does it cause an insulin spike, or is it working through some other mechanism?

    Thanks.

  187. Jerry Malone May 27, 2012 at 7:52 pm - Reply

    Awesome information! Thank you Jack. This info needs its own blog. Please consider writing blogs about:

    1)TXNIP effect on metabolism
    2)Optimal IFing and exactly how to induce lipolysis
    3)When and how to eat carbs in season, as you mentioned.
    4)How does altitude/ambient pressure tie in to all of this?

    Thanks again.

    • Jack May 27, 2012 at 7:53 pm - Reply

      @Jerry I promise I will get there but I have a theme going following the Quilt and getting people to understand a totally new perspective to gain a new reality for our species.

  188. Jerry Malone May 27, 2012 at 7:52 pm - Reply

    Awesome information! Thank you Jack. This info needs its own blog. Please consider writing blogs about:

    1)TXNIP effect on metabolism
    2)Optimal IFing and exactly how to induce lipolysis
    3)When and how to eat carbs in season, as you mentioned.
    4)How does altitude/ambient pressure tie in to all of this?

    Thanks again.

  189. Jennifer Johnson May 31, 2012 at 11:18 am - Reply

    Caught my eye – bloodletting is back in the news –
    http://news.yahoo.com/bloodletting-makes-comeback-metabolic-syndrome-161308622.html

    • Jack May 31, 2012 at 12:05 pm - Reply

      @Jennifer its back in medicine too. I saw one referral doc refer two patients for blood donation this month.

  190. Jennifer Johnson May 31, 2012 at 11:18 am - Reply

    Caught my eye – bloodletting is back in the news –
    http://news.yahoo.com/bloodletting-makes-comeback-metabolic-syndrome-161308622.html

    • Jack May 31, 2012 at 12:05 pm - Reply

      @Jennifer its back in medicine too. I saw one referral doc refer two patients for blood donation this month.

  191. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA June 1, 2012 at 10:51 pm - Reply

    Interesting History Channel on Demand (if you have Direct TV).. “journey to 10,000 B.C.”. Talks about extinction of mammoths, the Younger Dryas climate change event (cold snap), and disappearance of the Clovis culture paleo Indians in N America. We know about KT when the dinosaurs went extinct. We also know from ice cores that the Younger Dryas happened over one generation not over eons. Scientists have found nano diamonds in the sediments which suggest an extraterrestrial impact (very high pressure needed to form diamonds). Carbon spherules found in sediments of the time contain these nano diamonds. Also found are “fullerenes” (named after Buckminster Fuller) which are found in asteroids and comets. They are found in the KT event and now also in the 10,000 b.c. Event which happened 13,000 years ago. Evidence suggests that the impact was in the ice sheet, which of course melted leaving no evidence of a crater.

    Comet theorists think its impact separated the glacial lobe that then diverted freshwater melt water from going down the Mississippi to instead going up the St Lawrence River to the Atlantic, messing with the ocean warm/cold currents and causing the ice shield to advance once again, causing the extinction event. Dust storms erupt (geologic evidence of deposition of very thick fine dust layers about this time) because the earth was cold and dry, killing vegetation. Another time when it would have been advantageous for hominids to be able to very quickly adapt to the cold.

    Archeological evidence shows large animals were wiped out but not people in these ice age conditions. Clovis paleo Indians moved west and adapted as they moved to the new environments. Prehistoric humans in the western US are known to have come from Europe and also from Asia based on genomic evidence and differences in tools also suggest two cultural sources of these humans. Scientists speculate the cultures combine and share information. This is Folsom people named after Folsom NM where their tools were first discovered.

    They found a Folsom “winter house” from the time of the younger dryas. They built semi permanent structures to winter for longer periods than their ancestors, using aspen trees as frames, mud as plaster, built during the dry (winter) season. So on the mountaintop you had water from snow, a shelter, and warmer up above the valley floor (cold sinks), and you can see your prey..the last megafauna game animals, the bison.

    These are our ancestors…before they began agriculture. Was building their structures the beginning of the mismatch, causing them to stay in one place longer and make agriculture more logical? … One has to wonder…

    The show points out that our paleo ancestors had options in controlling their environment that animals didn’t have. For sure after reading Jack’s blogs, this has me seeing things through a whole different lens……!!!

    • Jack June 2, 2012 at 7:53 am - Reply

      @Krusing I would have loved to see that show……

  192. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA June 1, 2012 at 10:51 pm - Reply

    Interesting History Channel on Demand (if you have Direct TV).. “journey to 10,000 B.C.”. Talks about extinction of mammoths, the Younger Dryas climate change event (cold snap), and disappearance of the Clovis culture paleo Indians in N America. We know about KT when the dinosaurs went extinct. We also know from ice cores that the Younger Dryas happened over one generation not over eons. Scientists have found nano diamonds in the sediments which suggest an extraterrestrial impact (very high pressure needed to form diamonds). Carbon spherules found in sediments of the time contain these nano diamonds. Also found are “fullerenes” (named after Buckminster Fuller) which are found in asteroids and comets. They are found in the KT event and now also in the 10,000 b.c. Event which happened 13,000 years ago. Evidence suggests that the impact was in the ice sheet, which of course melted leaving no evidence of a crater.

    Comet theorists think its impact separated the glacial lobe that then diverted freshwater melt water from going down the Mississippi to instead going up the St Lawrence River to the Atlantic, messing with the ocean warm/cold currents and causing the ice shield to advance once again, causing the extinction event. Dust storms erupt (geologic evidence of deposition of very thick fine dust layers about this time) because the earth was cold and dry, killing vegetation. Another time when it would have been advantageous for hominids to be able to very quickly adapt to the cold.

    Archeological evidence shows large animals were wiped out but not people in these ice age conditions. Clovis paleo Indians moved west and adapted as they moved to the new environments. Prehistoric humans in the western US are known to have come from Europe and also from Asia based on genomic evidence and differences in tools also suggest two cultural sources of these humans. Scientists speculate the cultures combine and share information. This is Folsom people named after Folsom NM where their tools were first discovered.

    They found a Folsom “winter house” from the time of the younger dryas. They built semi permanent structures to winter for longer periods than their ancestors, using aspen trees as frames, mud as plaster, built during the dry (winter) season. So on the mountaintop you had water from snow, a shelter, and warmer up above the valley floor (cold sinks), and you can see your prey..the last megafauna game animals, the bison.

    These are our ancestors…before they began agriculture. Was building their structures the beginning of the mismatch, causing them to stay in one place longer and make agriculture more logical? … One has to wonder…

    The show points out that our paleo ancestors had options in controlling their environment that animals didn’t have. For sure after reading Jack’s blogs, this has me seeing things through a whole different lens……!!!

  193. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA June 1, 2012 at 10:56 pm - Reply

    Also check out “Brave New World with Stephen Hawking” episode titled “biology” on the Science channel. They talk about epigenetics…. I was half asleep trying to get over a sinus infection when I heard that word, shot atraight up in bed, imediately awake, and grabbed the remote for a rewind. They talked about how a major Canadian ice storm caused a prolonged power outage, causing stress to the developing babies due to prolonged cold exposure of the mothers. They are following these children to see the epogenetic effects of this exposure. I couldn’t help thinking it would have been handy to be a cold-adapted human during that time…. Other epigenetics examples were also discussed.

    I can’t listen to anything the same way now after hearing Jacks webinars and reading his blog.. It is all connecting and making sense!!!

    • Jack June 2, 2012 at 7:54 am - Reply

      @Krusing Ironically one of my patients told me about that show but I have never seen it. I will need to look for it.

  194. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA June 1, 2012 at 10:56 pm - Reply

    Also check out “Brave New World with Stephen Hawking” episode titled “biology” on the Science channel. They talk about epigenetics…. I was half asleep trying to get over a sinus infection when I heard that word, shot atraight up in bed, imediately awake, and grabbed the remote for a rewind. They talked about how a major Canadian ice storm caused a prolonged power outage, causing stress to the developing babies due to prolonged cold exposure of the mothers. They are following these children to see the epogenetic effects of this exposure. I couldn’t help thinking it would have been handy to be a cold-adapted human during that time…. Other epigenetics examples were also discussed.

    I can’t listen to anything the same way now after hearing Jacks webinars and reading his blog.. It is all connecting and making sense!!!

    • Jack June 2, 2012 at 7:54 am - Reply

      @Krusing Ironically one of my patients told me about that show but I have never seen it. I will need to look for it.

  195. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA June 2, 2012 at 10:29 am - Reply

    @Jack find a friend with Direct TV, can watch these on Demand right now. I’ve been sick so I’m mining the on-demand science stuff with a whole new set of eyes since I’ve read your stuff!

  196. Krusing_to_Optimal_in_CA June 2, 2012 at 10:29 am - Reply

    @Jack find a friend with Direct TV, can watch these on Demand right now. I’ve been sick so I’m mining the on-demand science stuff with a whole new set of eyes since I’ve read your stuff!

  197. Nonchalant June 5, 2012 at 3:41 pm - Reply

    Great find, Krusing. Hope you’re feeling better soon!

  198. Nonchalant June 5, 2012 at 3:41 pm - Reply

    Great find, Krusing. Hope you’re feeling better soon!

  199. […] we saw in our last CPC #4 maybe this liability today used to be a huge evolutionary advantage in eons passed? I think that is […]

  200. […] spoke about that in CPC #4. The answer is found in what is not in primate DNA and what is found in human DNA. In primates we […]

  201. […] spoke about that in CPC #4. The answer is found in what is not in primate DNA and what is found in human DNA. In primates we […]

  202. Andre van Staveren June 23, 2012 at 10:19 am - Reply

    Your remark nr 90 is so true. To me this blog – and the comments – is one of the most comprehensive. Not so much protein this or that, but the bird-view. I think only now I fully grasp the fundamental importance of cold. Cold should be default; cold showers are not enough.

    • Jack June 23, 2012 at 10:32 am - Reply

      @Andre…….in Cold thermogenesis 1 under radical rule number two I make the case that cold is primordial for all life. In Brain Gut 2 I make the declarative statement that cold is the primordial condition for human evolution as well, and I believe it is one of the 2 major epigenetic signals that formed our species as well in the African jungle. Therefore it is primordial for all humans. I expand on this greatly in BG3 where I add in geology and bio-astrophysics proofs to my beliefs.

  203. Andre van Staveren June 23, 2012 at 10:19 am - Reply

    Your remark nr 90 is so true. To me this blog – and the comments – is one of the most comprehensive. Not so much protein this or that, but the bird-view. I think only now I fully grasp the fundamental importance of cold. Cold should be default; cold showers are not enough.

    • Jack June 23, 2012 at 10:32 am - Reply

      @Andre…….in Cold thermogenesis 1 under radical rule number two I make the case that cold is primordial for all life. In Brain Gut 2 I make the declarative statement that cold is the primordial condition for human evolution as well, and I believe it is one of the 2 major epigenetic signals that formed our species as well in the African jungle. Therefore it is primordial for all humans. I expand on this greatly in BG3 where I add in geology and bio-astrophysics proofs to my beliefs.

  204. Andre van Staveren June 23, 2012 at 12:24 pm - Reply

    It’s really magic and I’m gratefull I found your blog. You don’t want to be somebody’s guru, but to me you are.

    I’ll reread the material with my current understanding; think it will stick better now I have the overview. Have a great weekend.

  205. […] is akin to how modern humans were dealt a death blow by Yersina Pestis in 1347 that we covered in CPC #4 or how humans fared initially against HIV in the 1980′s. Those disease killed lots of humans […]

  206. […] is akin to how modern humans were dealt a death blow by Yersina Pestis in 1347 that we covered in CPC #4 or how humans fared initially against HIV in the 1980′s. Those disease killed lots of humans […]

  207. […] was set forth by Dawkins recently.  In 2003, the Duke experiments I mentioned in earlier blogs like CPC #4, showed that epigenetics is how conditions of existence are readily translated in the mammalian […]

  208. […] was set forth by Dawkins recently.  In 2003, the Duke experiments I mentioned in earlier blogs like CPC #4, showed that epigenetics is how conditions of existence are readily translated in the mammalian […]

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